Tag: stand up

Paul Provenza – The History and Future of Comedy

Paul Provenza came to school me in comedy . We talk about his early years. stand up, his transition to television actor and show host to creating his own voice in film directing and filmmaking in the comedy space.

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matt nappo 0:01
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And welcome my friends to yet another episode of the mind dog TV podcast. I’m Matt nappo. Thanks for coming. It’s great to have you here. As always, just a important little note here. We’re not live, although I’m streaming this live the first time you see it. I’m not really live. This is pre taped. As a matter of fact, that could actually be dead by the time you’re seeing this. But hopefully that’s not the case. Anyway, today, I have finally arranged for the fabulous Paul provenza. To be with us. You know, if you tried to tune in when we had Paul scheduled a couple of weeks ago, we had some technical difficulties, which is the reason we are pre taping today to make sure that none of those technical difficulties get in the way of today’s broadcast. Now Paul prevented you know, as a comedian, a film director and author, all around renaissance man and a man full of respect and insight into the world of comedy. And it’s my pleasure to bring you this interview with a great and fabulous Paul Pimentel. Ladies and gentlemen, open your ears, open your minds and help me welcome in the fabulous Paul provenza to the mind dog TV podcast.

Paul Provenza 3:00
Thanks for having me. Finally, without tech problems, anybody that didn’t catch it the last time My apologies.

matt nappo 3:08
I actually deleted that pretty quickly after it was done. Because it was just, it was a lot of me trying to cover dead air. And it was it was not

Paul Provenza 3:18
that good. Look how well it’s working. Now I have to say,

matt nappo 3:23
I appreciate the effort. I’m coming back. And thank you very much for that. So Oh, there’s so much to talk about with you. And you’re probably one of the first stand up comedians I ever saw back in the day when I was a young man, and you’re only a couple years older than me. And I know you’re from Pelham Parkway area in the Bronx, which is kind of my neighborhood. So I grew up in the 70s and was a huge fan of stand up comedy, but I know that you got started young in it. Right? And so I look at my work and being in that world today. I didn’t know anybody who had the call and composure to do stand up comedy as a teenager in those years. And just the intelligence and, you know, ability to have something to talk about. Talk to me about you’re getting started.

Paul Provenza 4:13
Wow, wow, that’s so kind of you. I can’t believe it. Where did you see me at the improv?

matt nappo 4:18
Yeah, yes. Yeah. And it was like, you know what I, you know, memory is what it is, but it was at the improv, but I think it was late 70s might have been at, I don’t know, it was it was early, it was early and I was out, you know, again, I’m only like one or two years behind you. And as I was thinking at the time, how come I don’t have you know, any friends who are doing it, the balls first of all the balls to get up and do it. But the, you know, most of people who were teenagers sweated when the teacher called them to read out out loud in class and here’s this guy, you know, just a year or two older than us and just as common and composed and professional and it was just like, this is this is for adults. Not fair. People. So that’s what you buy.

Paul Provenza 5:04
Wow. Well thank you for those kind words. But um, yeah, and I started really young. And you know, I started going to the improv as a patron, when I was about 15, maybe with, I had an older cousin, who, you know, bought me a lot of time with my parents staying out until one two in the morning. He was big, big, big influence in my life still is, and, and I would go with some friends from high school. And I mean, I remember sitting there and seeing it was amazing. I’m actually back then even Gilbert godfried had already been doing it for a while. Wow. And I remember seeing any lien boozer and at blue stone, and Franken and Davis and Larry David, just, you know, phenomenal comedians who went on to varying degrees of visibility and success. Andy Kaufman in his early days, you know, when I was very, very young, I had the opportunity of being the victim to an the, in early incarnation of Tony Clifton, which he was doing without makeup or wardrobe, or anything he was just doing as a guy in the audience. And he would Heckle comics and just see what happened. I mean, yeah, I was really young when I started. So I started going to the improv it like 15. And then I did my first time on stage at, I think 16, or between somewhere around 1617. And here’s the cool thing. Back then you had to, you had to wait online, you know, if you an open mic, or you had to line up at like, you know, people would Sorry, I showed up once at like, 10 in the morning. It wasn’t gonna open until 810 in the morning, that’s good. And I lived way up in the Bronx, so I had to slip up subway schlep all the way down to Midtown Manhattan in Hell’s Kitchen. And so I get there at 10 o’clock, and it’s already a huge long line. And you have to wait online and you have to, you know, just wait until they opened up or until they brought out a bucket with numbers in it at like six or seven. And then you took your number, and it was random, it didn’t even necessarily have to do with how long you are online. And it was weird. And so I ended up with a very, very high number, and at about three or 330 in the morning, because they used to stay open till 4am legal curfew, or until the last patron left. So on audition nights, it was always you know, 4am so like, three 330 in the morning, I still had a bunch of numbers before me. And I went up to the MC and I said it’s not my number yet, but I was wondering if maybe you can move me ahead a couple of numbers because I have school in three hours.

and and the the MC just cracked up and he wants your kid. And he brought me up next. And I got to tell that story to Jay Leno on The Tonight Show. He was the house MC Wow. So that was my I was like 16, maybe turning 17 at the time, the first time I went on stage. And it was something that I just always wanted to do since I was a really little kid. I just really felt connected to it. Yeah, I have a lot of theories as to why. But I just always wanted to do it. It was a real need. And my first time on stage was a nightmare. I mean, it was horrible because the three 330 in the morning, all kinds of other Open Mind. And because the improv was at 44th and ninth, which is like poker Central, you know, there are always a couple of hookers and maybe a pimp that came in to have a drink and get out of the cold or something. So it was just a horrible, horrible experience. But when I came off stage after that first absolute, you know, disaster, he could have been traumatizing. But here’s the weird thing it wasn’t I actually thought to myself, I can’t wait to do that again and figure this out. And so then I went away to college, I went to university, Pennsylvania, it was in Philadelphia, and started performing around Philadelphia, there were a few other people at the school. And through people I had met, I had met some other people in Philadelphia that were starting to do stand up. And there was they were trying to sort of a scene was kind of beginning to happen. So I was getting a lot of work while I was in Philadelphia at going to school. And then I would drive up to New York on three day weekends or holidays or whatever or when I you know, had the energy to do that. I would drive up to New York and continue getting online for open mics on Sundays. And within a year, I think maybe four or five times getting on stage. I passed auditions at the improv. So I was back at school doing stand up with my friend And whatever, you know, Penn was a big school so I could put together shows and different dorms and they would be like different all different markets, you know, kind of. And so I was getting all this stage time. So every time I would go back up to New York, I would have more and more experience and more stage time, which the other people do in the open mics weren’t, they weren’t getting. So I rose pretty quickly through those ranks. And one of the first people that I met that was an improv regular, who sort of took me under his wing. And he was a young guy at the time as well, he was only a few years older than I, but had been doing it and had shown unbelievable gifts in stand up. And comedy in general was Rick Overton who still to this day is one of my dearest friends. He was like, he was like, one of the new kids on the block that I was trying to join. And he just immediately introduced me to so many people saying, you got to see this kid, you got to see this kid. And so he helped really bring me into that fold. And it was life changing. So by the time I was 17, you’re well into 17, or 18. By my second year at Penn, they had a rathskeller on campus, which they don’t have anymore, because at the time, the drinking age was 18. Right, which had happened because of the Vietnam War, because it became, you know, it became impossible for them to not lower the drinking age, because people were sending us off to die and 18, but we can’t have a beer. So the drinking age was was lower than so they had literally a bar on campus called the rathskeller. And

they offered me a Saturday night slot every week to do stand up. And I would do like an hour an hour and 15 however much material I had every week, and a lot of it was about you know, going to school and being a kid and you know, being a college kid and all that stuff. But there were enough I had enough times on stage there that I actually could develop material and go back to the improv with material that was going to work. And that I had already worked out and everything so so when I got out of school, I immediately started working at the improv. And then within a year, I had a pilot on ABC television, which brought me out to Los Angeles and I just stayed. But it was a pretty it was a different time, there was just not that many people into stand up, it was still a pretty rarefied art form, you know, what was it like now, and there wasn’t as much access to stage time as there is now and I’m saying that with tremendous affection for them this moment because I think you know, the voices that are coming out of standard I think this is a golden age of stand up now. You know, there was a boom in the 80s. But that was like a boom of the business of comedy. And there’s a boom now That to me is more about a boom in the art form of comedy with so many different kinds of comedy and different voices and different appreciation for different kinds of things. And you know people that is people watching your podcast right now is like you we never had an audience of people who are interested in the mechanics of comedy or interested in what really goes on in the world of comedy or interested in a comedians life outside of what they do on stage. And that’s a relatively new phenomenon that has just exploded and and I think it’s been amazing for the artform.

matt nappo 13:24
Wow, I got I got a there’s so much in that in that simple edge to talk about. But on that golden age of comedy stuff. I’m a little bit torn on that. Because boomers my age, right, I brought up Bill Burr to my friends, and they didn’t know who he was. They didn’t know who he was. But coming back to you being a young man doing this and I asked this on Twitter just the other night, who is a young comics and capital young that I should know right now because I know a lot of people 50 and older. I know some but most of the really successful ones I know are 50 or 50 year old are in that area. And the young people coming up so when you say golden age because they’re I think it’s all a little bit oversaturated what you asked to do with some of this canceled culture stuff, I think it’s a lot of that is young comedians looking to cancel established comedians and looking for dirt on them. Because there’s just so many people doing it right now. So but talk about that, well,

Paul Provenza 14:26
that that’s just a variation of what’s always going on, you know, the younger generation, be it music, be it acting be a comedy, be it painting, sculpture, the younger generation always sort of rejects the ones that came before them, or at least immediately before them, you know, that’s kind of part of the process of evolution that has to happen. And I think this canceled culture thing. It’s just a different way of going about it. But you know in in the 1980s in 1980 Don Ward and his partners opened the car Comedy Store in London. And the it was almost as if a switch was flicked because it was we’re gonna do a new kind of comedy. And they rejected outright all the old school forms of comedy. You wouldn’t find it at the Comedy Store and everybody that was working at the Comedy Store was maligning all the old school and there was basically a canceled culture of people like oh geez, I can’t think of the names but all these stalwarts of British stand up comedy, were just relegated to the dustbin. And it’s exactly what’s happening now. 40 years later. So I kind of always happen that way. It’s different now because of social media and the way it’s all the the how everything’s become politicized. It’s more than just like, Oh, I didn’t want to do material. That’s old school. It’s more politically politicized now than ever before, but the phenomenon itself has always been going on. But here’s the difference between what’s happening now in that regard. And when I was coming up, is that, you know, back then, first of all, there were a million talk shows and they were afternoon talk show. So it was dinosaur there was Merv Griffin, there was my list. There was john Davidson. There was you know, there were all these afternoon talk shows, right? And then there were the late night talk shows, of course, the tonight show Johnny Carson being the king, but also there was Joey Bishop and they were, it was Alan Thicke in the mid 80s. And all these were a million talk shows right? And they would have comedians on, but they back in those days, it wasn’t so demographically driven. So you could be watching the tonight show or Merv Griffin or Deke Cavett. And you could see, you know, the hip new young Freddie Prinze on the same panel with Alan King, or, you know, Milton Berle, or something like that. And so you got exposed to a real breadth of comedy on the same TV shows, you know, they would also do that in other regards to you know, they would have john lennon on but they’d also have, you know, gore of a doll on the same show, all right, you know, and that’s all different now. And now, it’s, uh, you can’t find a show that’s gonna book you know, an old school, you know, comic in their 80s on the same bill with, you know, Moses storm was a young guy that I just saw recently that I think has tremendous down, you know, that’s why on the green room, and even on comics, only back in the late 80s, when I was doing that show, I always made an effort to have, you know, Robert Klein on the show, and Jonathan Winters on the show, along with Bo Burnham and, you know, really mix the generations on greenroom in particular, I also mix people from the UK and people that I had, you know, grown aware of from doing the international festival circuit and stuff. Because it’s like, nobody questions that music, like nobody in music would question, Well, why is James Taylor working with this, you know, young 22 year old bands, like how did that happen, right? intuitively makes sense. It’s about the art form. And it’s about music, but they don’t think of it in terms of comedy. But that’s really, you know, I hope that the younger generation, you know, grows to appreciate those that came before and sort of just just to look at, look at them as something valuable, not something that has to be discarded. I do look at that, like Phyllis Diller has sort of been re captured as a major force for women in comedy, because in the 70s, during the feminist wave, she was sort of tossed aside as, you know, she does self deprecating stuff, and this and that, and this and that, but the truth is, she was also doing what she needed to do to play in the big ball game to play, you know, with Bob Hope and, and, and Sinatra, and all those people, you know, and she did what she did, because that’s what she had to do to make a living and to become successful. But she did it brilliantly. And was hilarious. And she broke down all kinds of barriers

matt nappo 19:02
for women in Korea. Absolutely. Yeah. So but she

Paul Provenza 19:07
was maligned in the 70s as being part of that old school, you know, not on woke, you know, philosophy but, but she actually really did more for women comics than just about, you know, just about anybody. So she’s I like that she’s being appreciated now more than she had been for quite some time. And that’s what I hope happens to a lot of the older generation is that that the appreciation to them really grows.

matt nappo 19:31
Well on that, you know, you mentioned Bo Burnham. Whoa, whoa. That happens. You get in a spam call. Take the call. Yeah. You mentioned both. recently about that, aren’t. You mentioned Bo Burnham. And I think that’s relevant to this conversation because there was a episode of the green room where you had Bo Burnham and Garry Shandling and a couple you know you talk about mixing these people. And I think just to get sidetracked for a moment I think you are kind of you know they have six degrees of separation and then they have the game 60 Degrees of Kevin Bacon. I think in the commodity world they should be six degrees of Paul Brenda because you connect. You connect the world of Buddy Hackett to the world of Bo Burnham, right and everything in between. You guys you just mentioned but that show with with with Bo Burnham and it’s still in my mind, Bo Burnham and I know Gary Shandling was one of the guys on the show. Yeah,

Paul Provenza 20:37
I tried. The whole lineup actually was Bo Burnham. Garry Shandling. Ray Romano, Mark Marin. And Judd Apatow.

matt nappo 20:46
Wow. And so when that when you were putting those shows together, were you hand picking them for each episode and saying this is the group I want?

Paul Provenza 20:55
Yeah, that was really my that was really my sort of creative domain was to put together combinations of people that I thought would be interesting, provocative, all those different things. And and largely, it had to do with, you know, what I know about each of those people. I mean, I did scrap entire shows like they were shows where I had four people lined up and it felt like oh, this is a show that’s going to go in some interesting directions, I’m really happy with that, and then somebody would drop out. And I would end up scrapping the whole show, because it wasn’t the kind of thing we could just go, well, who else is available was an intuitive idea. I mean, I wanted the show to be really spontaneous. I didn’t have any agenda, per se, for any particular episode. But in putting certain groups of people together, I did have a sense of where something could go and whose personalities would match or clash and interesting, fun ways, or whatever the case may be. I mean, that really was the big difference between the greenroom and tough crowd, which was a great show is a tough crowd was all about conflict. And I didn’t want the grief be about conflict I want if conflict arose, conflict arose, but I didn’t want that to be what it was about, I really wanted it to be an example because when I was when I was 1617, and just getting into the world of comedy, it was regulatory To me it was regulatory to me to find an entire group of other people who also felt like aliens in their own lives, who also looked at the world in a different way. who also had a sensibility of you know, when you’re when you’re a real comic when it’s in your bones, comedy just kind of happens to you the way the way I would imagine for a musician that he rhythms all the time you know, you’re walking down the street here dog bark and car door slam, you know, screech, the tie or whatever, it all becomes rhythmic right? Well that’s true for comedy too. When you’re really immersed in it and it becomes a lens through which you experience the world. That same thing happens in comedy just kinds of happens and and walking into the improv and being among a group of people who were in that same space they existed in the world and that kind of way was revelatory for me I it just changed my life and I always even going back as far as comics only which was late 80s I always wanted to try and give an audience that experience that feeling of oh wow look you can be in a room full of people having a really heated argument but nobody’s angry at each other and and you’ll you’ll laugh at some point no matter what and people actually communicate ideas and you know and and and there are conflicts and there are things in concert and I just felt like the experience of being in in a group of people who are you know, that’s the way their existence is was something I wish I could share with everybody and I tried it with comics only in a very sort of primitive way. The idea of comics only was you know, I always want to watch the tonight show but I was I only cared about the comedian’s satiated going seeing you know, the Rolling Stones or whoever. But the real reason that I was watching this for the comedians and and I thought, well, what if we do a tonight show but the only guests are comedians so you don’t have to listen to somebody plug in their book or talking about their new special tour or whatever. So that was the premise behind comics only. And I was hoping to sort of evoke the idea of what it’s like to hang out among other comedians to varying degrees of success. You know, one of the things that I did with that show was I gave he gave the guests the option of doing prepared material and conversation format, which is what you did on the show. If you you know, when you went on The Tonight Show if you were doing a stand up spot and they said okay, you’re going to sit on the panel with Johnny for five minutes, you would prepare a conversation with Johnny, you told me, you’d give them things to lead you into stuff you wanted to do. And that was a sort of convention of the time. And so I gave the comics on comics only, I gave them the option, we can do that. Or we can just sit and see what happened. And some people chose the ladder some people chose the form and most people chose the former again, because they said it was sort of like the convention at the time. But some people chose the ladder and some people surprised the hell out of me every time they came on, like, you know, Judy toll was, I never knew what she was going to do. And those were among my favorite moments, but so comics only didn’t really rise to what I really was hoping to accomplish, which was a sense of what’s it like to hang out with comics.

And then 35 years later, I had the chance to try it at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival, I was given a time slot to do whatever I wanted to do. And it happened to be a very late night time slot and most comics had finished their shows. And I thought, well, let’s see if I can get the vibe, you know, in a live show, of just hanging out with comics after their sets. And then after doing that, for, you know, a handful of shows, and by the way, the fringe is a great play, the Edinburgh Fringe was a great place to develop material or projects because you do 28 shows in a row. And that’s like, you know, a year of development time. And you know, you find immediately the next day, let’s change this, let’s try that let’s do this, you know. So by the end of the month in Edinburgh, of doing these live shows, and I had brought up some some friends who had cameras and some experience in production, they said, let’s figure out how we could shoot this if we were ever going to shoot this for television. And that’s where we came up with the you know, the very sort of active camera movement and the idea of capturing what’s happening in the moment. So when we got down when we finally got a deal to do the show on television, I had always been frustrated because I had done stand up on television. And you always have to adapt to the medium. You’re frozen. Are we still together? Oh, okay,

matt nappo 27:08
I’m frozen.

Paul Provenza 27:13
Well, you are you wrapped is that it you just wrapped. But I would always I was frustrated doing television and doing stand up on television and watching stand up on television, I was frustrated that what was most exciting and interesting about stand up to me, which was the this idea of spontaneity, and the idea that, you know, a comic can respond to anything in the moment. And just, I just love that reality of it. That’s what makes a live show. So interesting. And I always felt like all that was sort of, you know, gone, when you when you were doing television, and from doing it on television, I would know, they would say, here’s your mark, here’s where the cameras are, you know, you got to coordinate to the production. So I approached greenroom in the opposite direction. And I said, What if the production has to accommodate the comedy. And so I made sure, you know, I, I said, I want all the camera people to have had experience with news and sports. Because we don’t know where the ball is coming or where it’s going. We don’t know what’s going to happen, what’s going to be as I want to be able to capture it all with a real sense of Oh, this really literally just happened. So you know, put the cameras in the audience in the group and made the crowd really so intimate and aren’t, you know, surrounding everybody so that the audience that I also hate, hate, hate, hate. Audience cutaways and stand up shows, I hate them. I hate them, I hate them. They’re hack, they’re annoying, they bring nothing to the game. All they are is just cheap and easy ways to do shitty edits, I fucking hate the gray audience, every shot, if you want to know what’s going on in the audience, it’s there for you to see if you care to look at it. Right? So production style of the green room was also very, very considered. And we had done a lot of work, you know, with cameras doing the live shows and everything. And I feel like I finally came close to accomplishing what I wanted to accomplish 35 years earlier.

matt nappo 29:01
Wow. You know, I there’s, again, there’s a lot to comment on that. But I just briefly going back to comics only because you just answered a very big question in my mind. I remember specifically, I had, you know how you go back to your memories of your old school and you think it was just so gigantic. I remember coming away as as this in depth thing with comics specifically. And I thought, wow, you know, and to me, in my mind, it was always an hour and a half a half hour show. But I go back to the Bill Hicks thing. And the first time I think he was on, I looked at it. At the time, I thought, well, that’s the stolen material. he’s doing he’s doing an album and I just mastered because I was a mastering guy at the time and I just messed it a CD think it was dangerous. And then then he was on again and it felt like a in depth conversation and I was like wow Berenson Difference between his first appearance on and the second one. So he first he had the option to say I’m going to do material that first. Right? I was confused by that, because I was like, the format of the show change what happened here?

Paul Provenza 30:13
You know? Yeah, well that’s the thing, though I had never done a hosting TV thing before most of the comics, a lot of them, it was their first time on television, you know. So we were all sort of figuring things out that finger figuring things out. We also did some really, really dark sketches and things on there. I mean, Fred wolf was my head writer, and my, you know, announcer slash sidekick on the show. So we did a lot of really, really dark stuff on that show that the network had no idea we were doing because we started doing the show when the network was hot. And then they merged with the HBO comedy channel and became Comedy Central, we were already in production, and the right hand didn’t know what the left hand was doing. And so nobody knew what we were actually doing until we delivered it. And at that point, they were like, We can’t air half of this stuff, because the sketches were really dark. I mean, blown people’s brains out and stuff, you know, very cartoony, like, creme, violent, you know, blood soaked kind of moments, but then you’d come back and Fred would have a little, you know, cartoon x band aid and he go, like, I just got a little headache, but I’m okay, you know. So we did all of these weird over the top and dark and weird things. And the network was like, we can’t run this and we were like, well, you already produced them. Why don’t you run them and see if they’re a problem? And it was so not together yet at that point that they weren’t okay. We did 165 episodes.

matt nappo 31:40
That’s That’s a lot of those. So yeah, that’s got to be some gold in there on YouTube. I mean, yeah.

Paul Provenza 31:46
And it’s, it’s kind of a time capsule of the comedy boom, because you know it. Jeff Foxworthy. Judd Apatow did his first TV appearance as a stand up of Bob Goldthwait. Jon Stewart, Dennis Leary. Ellen DeGeneres, you know of one of her first talk show spots ever.

matt nappo 32:10
Read stollery Fred Stoller and Sam Kinison.

Paul Provenza 32:17
Yeah, it was Steven Wright. Again, at show also I did a whole episode with Phyllis Diller. Steve Allen was a regular on the show he would come and do all sorts of sketches with us. Rip Taylor was like our Larry bud Melman at the time where he would do anything and we just would come up with the weirdest shit for rip Taylor to do and he loved it. You know, we had old school, young school, we had old school doing stuff that you wouldn’t normally see them doing. You know, it was great, great. A great training ground for a lot of us. And there’s not much of it online at one point I put up clips but the clips we can’t find the original master tapes. Wow, that line actually come from VHS tapes that my mother made when they were when they were broadcast.

matt nappo 33:16
Oh my god. That’s that’s Yeah, I can relate but because i was i was i a library of master tapes to the perfect storm and flood that I had. And so I can relate to that. That’s a sad thing, though. Cuz that that’s why the history of comic comedy history.

Paul Provenza 33:34
Yeah, but like, you know, No, nobody really cares. Nobody. They don’t really care. I care. Scorsese, Martin Scorsese ain’t gonna step up and do a restoration project on the episodes Komsomol

matt nappo 33:50
here, but I would definitely love to see that film still episode, man, I would, you know, go back and find that on YouTube. that’s a that’s a gym. So you, you obviously have a respect. You know, you mentioned Steve Allen and, and people like that a respect for those who came before and the history. The You know, there is a proud history to the crap, let’s put it that way. But do you think that that’s lost? Do you think a lot of comedians working today have your same respect and, you know, for the history of the craft?

Paul Provenza 34:24
Actually, I don’t, I think quite the opposite. But it’s a double edged sword. Because while I think that most I mean, like you said, you will, you know, I’ll talk to you on comics. And I’ll ask them, you know, like, they may remind me of somebody and I would say, Have you ever seen so and so and you go, No, you know, and it always sort of discourages me that Wow, man, there’s so much to be had by going back to the original masters, so to speak. Even if, you know, it’s no longer their time, there’s still an amazing amount to be gleaned from what they were doing. just soak up and you know, it’s like be like a pianist not knowing, you know, Beethoven. You know, just because you play jazz piano doesn’t mean you shouldn’t know, Bach, you know, it kind of feels like that, and but I really do think a lot of it is faded, ironically, because with YouTube, you can see people that you would never even imagine I love going down YouTube rabbit holes and finding people, you know, in discovering people that I didn’t, you know, didn’t know at the time when I was starting out that I wish I had known, you know, but the flip side of that is, what we tend to be seeing now are really much more original voices, and much more original perspectives. And as much of that has to do with the time in which they’re coming up. It also has to do with the fact that well, they’re not, you know, they’re not just doing impressions of other comedians that they’ve seen, because when most comics start out, that’s really what they’re doing. is a lie. Yeah, you know, even like, like for me coming up, it was, you know, I wanted to be, and this was a really challenging thing. I wanted to be Woody Allen, I wanted to be Robert Klein, and I want it to be Richard Pryor. So how do you find the three the overlap between the three of them, you know, but a lot of us when I was coming up, a lot of us sounded just like Robert Klein, who was you know, at, you know, his his I wouldn’t say peak because he’s had a lot of, you know, he had a long peak. But a lot of us were very, very influenced by Robert Klein, and a lot of us had similar inflections and rhythms and things to Robert Klein. And I think the reason is because Robert Klein, really spoke to us, like Robert Klein was the first comedian to break through that middle class, college educated people who are interested in comedy could relate to it like, well, he’s, he’s us. He’s a middle class, college educated, you know, guy who does stand up, you know, and so he was like somebody that we all gravitated towards is kind of a beacon. You know, a lot of us I mean, myself and Paul riser and Larry Miller, and a handful of other comics, people would constantly say, You sound like him, you sound like him. You sound like him. He sounds like you He sounds like you. And it’s because we all had this tremendous Robert Klein influence,

matt nappo 37:25
you know, well, client as a musician, and I know, and I feel like sometimes I may just overdo it with the comparisons between art forms and stuff. And I like to compare music to kind of stand up comedy and so forth. And I realized that you do it to it, because even in this conversation, I’ve heard you do it a couple of times, you know, talking about rhythms and stuff. Do you Are you a musician? on any level? Do you play anything?

Paul Provenza 37:53
I don’t any longer but I actually was a musician around the same time that I was really getting interested in stand up i was i was a musician. And much to my chagrin, this is one of the great regrets I have in my life. When I decided that I was going to go full bore into stand up comedy, I didn’t want anything to get in the way of my focus. And I literally put all my instruments away in a closet and never touch them again. Wow. And is the biggest regret I ever had.

matt nappo 38:24
I think I think you’re right to do it though. I mean, because I as somebody who’s tried to walk both both of those and I knew that I knew I couldn’t do stand up comedy and and be in a band because it just a financial aspect of it. I have to give up a $300 gig playing music to go work at an open mic night where I’m not going to get paid. It just didn’t make any sense to me. So

Paul Provenza 38:47
yeah, now of course I realized that oh my god, they really one would one would help the other so much whether I did it or not. It’s still it. There’s the similarities between the art forms are unbelievable. And I realized now that that was, that’s, that’s something that I regret for sure. But at the time, that’s how focused I was on stand up that I thought to myself, anytime I play, anytime I spend practicing or playing an instrument, it’s time that I could be writing material and learning about comedy. And I it was, it’s a regret that I have, but it’s the choice that I made,

matt nappo 39:23
right? I think probably one that would help you become a successful comedian rather than being a non successful both.

Paul Provenza 39:31
Part of my attitude Yeah, I was kind of like, man, I felt like you had to really focus you have to be 100% a comedian. So you know, I just didn’t understand that music was not not being 100% a comedian as well. I didn’t I just didn’t know that at the time, you know, but the music aspect of comedy never left me I mean, the aristocrats that movie The biggest, the biggest, appreciate For that movie comes from musicians even more so than musicians get more specially jazz musicians, they get it more than anybody

matt nappo 40:08
there is improv.

Paul Provenza 40:11
And, and yeah, so much of comedy is rhythm and timing and, and also tone. I mean, like, you know, it’s amazing to watch people who understand the difference in levels of tone, you know, people who can throw something away and people who can, whom know when to push something, or, you know, it’s just, it really is like music. It really is. You know, when I when I had a rough cut of the aristocrats I brought it to a friend of mine who’s a composer. I mean, he’s, he’s won Emmys. And, you know, he’s written, composed music for a lot of big films and TV shows and things. And I brought it to him and I said, What do you think about music and, and, and he watched the whole thing, and he said, I think Music We’re just getting away, because it’s already, this is already musical. He goes, I can’t even find a place to drop a note. That’s not gonna fuck already there, as well. That’s pretty, that’s pretty interesting. And that’s why there’s no music until the closing credits, which was a jazz composition by Gary Stockdale who I said to him, Well, if you’re not gonna do any music in the movie, can you at least do a piece to the end? And he said, I think it should have a jazz vibe. And he ended up composing this piece that jazz musicians tell me is a really, really challenging piece of jazz. Yeah. It’s too sophisticated for me to understand just how good it is. But

matt nappo 41:27
no, it definitely is. And I think you’re right about that. Now you’re aristocrats. I wanted to go there because and right before the we hit the tape button. I mentioned to you to Jeff altman said hello, and that he’s a magician now and you kind of looked at me like what the hell is that all about? Now you’re with the aristocrats. You got together with Penn jillette? Who magician I’m just wondering how that came about that you got? I guess he’s comedy magician too. But he’s thought of in the magic world. How did that relationship come together? And was, you know, when, when the seed of that movie start?

Paul Provenza 42:06
What actually happened there was when Penn and Teller, excuse me, were doing their first off Broadway show. Their publicist was a friend of mine, who I’ve known since college when she was a college friend of mine, and she became a Broadway publicist. Her name is Jackie green, and she also has one of the best senses of humor. I spent years going, Jackie, why aren’t you doing comedy? Why aren’t you writing comedy? Why aren’t you were but like, she’s written so much stuff for Nathan Lane. Like whenever Nathan Lane hosts an award show or something like that all his best ship was written by Jackie Greene. She just she’s a natural, right? What her area where she makes a living as a Broadway publicist, and she never professionally became a comedian. But so she was handling the Penn and Teller show off Broadway. And she said, I think you guys would really get along. And she introduced us. And you know, over time, we became friends. And we started to, it became very clear to me that while Penn and Teller often would malign magicians, and they often would talk in a pen would often talk about comedy being, you know, hacky, and all of that sort of stuff. The truth is that they absolutely adore both comedians and magicians. And when that became clear to me, we really started to hang out a lot. And we would make each other laugh quite a bit. And we became friends for many, many, many years. And we would always talk about the aristocrats jokes, I forget how it came up, but we would talk about it and we would always laugh. And we would talk about people that we had heard do it and what they did to it, and you know, and all those kinds of things. And we would just sort of joke around fantasizing, like, could you imagine a tape of just like, you know, 10 comics, telling different versions of the aristocrats joke, it would be hilarious. And I’m like, this thing is like, all we got to do that tape, we got to do that tape, you know, for years and years and years. And then one day it came up again, we were hanging out late at night, I was finishing a show and panatela had finished their show in Vegas and we’re sitting at the pepper mill having a late night breakfast at like, one or two in the morning and and we were talking about it again and and we had both her Gilbert do it. And I think I told him about how Bob Saget is, like one of the foulest mouths ever that it’s just beyond the pale so it’s just hilarious. You know, I don’t know if he knew Bob at the time, but I know, I actually know Bob from my college days. That’s another story. But um, so at one point in this conversation, and I had been in a weird place in my career, I was he wasn’t really clear what the hell I was doing. But I had started going overseas and started working on the International Circuit, the festival circuit and spending a lot of time in the UK and so I was gone for long periods of time, and he was like, What are you doing? I was like, I was doing something, you know. And at that point he said, Listen, we’ve been talking about this thing for years. He goes, do you think we can actually do this? And I went, I don’t know. I don’t know what’s the point of it? And he goes, I don’t know maybe it’s just something funny we could do for ourselves and we could show friends of ours are weird because but he goes, if I commit to this, could you commit to this? And it was so late at night? I said, Yeah, sure.

matt nappo 45:28
Late at night, I love that.

Paul Provenza 45:32
Literally, we went, we went to, you know, like a Best Buy or something. fries or something, probably something that doesn’t exist anymore. And we bought to, you know, off the camera off the shelf consumer cameras. mini DV at the time was the new format. And we said, let’s see. So I called a handful of friends of mine I called Bobby Slayton, I called Jeff Ross. I’m sorry, not Jeff Ross, john Ross, who was terrific stand up and he was a writer on comics only. I called Kathy lagman. And I said, meet us at the improv. We’re going to do this crazy thing. We just, you know, we just want to see what happens. And so we did Bobby Slayton in the parking lot, Kathy Gladman in the parking lot. JOHN Rawson did in the men’s room at the improv. And then emo Philips came in to do a set. And he said, What are you doing? And I told him, and he went, Oh, that sounds awesome. I’d like to do that. So we sat down with emo Philips, and we did this thing. And the next morning, you know, we watched the tape. And Penn said, Well, I think we have proof of concept. I go, yes, I’m just not sure what the concept is. So we decided, let’s just keep going and see what happens. So we would take people and I again, I would be gone. I’d be in Europe, or Asia or whatever, you know, traveling around the world for three months, and then it come back for a month, a month and a half. And then they go away again for another two months and come back for three months. And it was a lot of that. And we would just coordinate. You know who he could set it up to do in Vegas, who I could set up to do in New York, when he was off from his shows, they had to break into shows he come to New York, and we do some stuff, and a bunch of people in LA and all that sort of stuff. And we just randomly contacted all these people we knew that would be interesting and fun to see do this. And then people started getting wind of it. And and then we started going like, well, we have enough here to start calling people that are crazy to call, like George car, you know? So we call George Carlin. And when we told them we were going to do this thing with the aristocrats he went all he goes, you’re kidding me? We said no. I think I have a whole notebook of ideas about this joke. He goes, call me in a month, I want to go find this and see if I can organize some thoughts. He goes, but I love this idea. And so a month or so later, we got together with him. And you know, after every buddy that we shot, you know, we would shoot two or three people in a day and drive from people’s houses to people’s offices, whatever and shoot. And he would always say in a pen would always say anything. He goes, What do you think we have anything here? And I would say, I just don’t know. I don’t know. I don’t know. After every day, I don’t just don’t know. And we went and shot Carlin and we packed up the gear. And we get back in the car and he sits down and he goes, What do you think? Do we have anything here? And I went Yep. I knew that George Carlin had given us whatever we needed to make something out of this. Wow, it though it was so perfect. It was almost linear, how he deconstructed the joke, how he his attitude about all the different aspects of it. And just, it was so professorial that I said, we have a spine, how we’re gonna hang everything else off of it, I don’t know, but we have a movie here. I know it. And so it was George Carlin that made it makes sense for all those

matt nappo 49:03
professorial that is the word I would use to describe George Carlin anytime after, say 1975 I think he started to become and I know a lot of it, he was doing a lot of college work at the time, but he just had that air of being more than a comedian in some way was teaching you something all the time.

Paul Provenza 49:23
He was always he was a student of comedy as well as a great comedian. And that’s one of the things that you know, that I felt I was as well I felt I just love discovering more and more about the art form and discovering more people that I didn’t know about and what they did. And you know, as funny as we were talking about going back to the old school people and everything is it’s like, you know, if brother Theodore or professor or when Cory for gap earning, if those guys were 20 years old and showed up on the comedy scene now they would be regarded as the greatest innovators. It would, it would be the hippest acts in comedy.

matt nappo 50:03
Wow, that’s food for thought for young people who are looking for inspiration. You know, that’s, that’s a good way to go. Yeah, you know, but Carlin, he’s one of the first guys, I think that I can remember. Who was this and then did a complete change and transformation into something else and remained successful that whole time. You know, Can you think of any others?

Paul Provenza 50:26
You’re absolutely right. No, I can’t think of many others. Most people, when they go through something like that they don’t actually come through the other side. They either don’t come through successfully, or they haven’t really changed that much. But you’re right about Carl. And I think that he is a case study. Yeah, for example, that he didn’t just change his image, or, you know, pander to a different audience. He literally changed as a human being. I mean, obviously, he had been changing internally before he started expressing it. But he, he changed from being about pleasing an audience to being about pleasing himself.

matt nappo 51:09
Right? Yeah. You know, and music they call it finding your voice in, in comedy, they often are, you hear it referred to often as developing your comedic character, you know, but

Paul Provenza 51:21
finding your existing thing. Most comedians now that they’re not real characters, right? You know. Interestingly, there are wonderful people there. They’re amazing people who who confuse that issue like Sarah Silverman, when, you know, when she became known, she was really doing a character. And now she’s not. Now you know, the irony is stripped away, and she’s really talking art. So she’s somebody who had a much, much more subtle, not as splashy way is making that transition like Carlin, but there aren’t many more,

matt nappo 51:57
right? Yeah, and it’s not as big of a difference I make from the hippy dippy weatherman, to what column was doing and becoming, you know, influenced by mort song, Lenny Bruce, and people like that and bringing that political aspect to it. Now I’m back before I get out, because I want to talk to what made you want to direct and get into directing stuff. But on that bad idea of that stuff, where we we go from there in the political world today, because in the days back in the day, I hate saying that phrase. But back in the day, you had people like calling and Pryor who would comment on political stuff. You had more Trump before him and Lenny Bruce, and all that, but commenting on it.

Paul Provenza 52:42
I gotta stop you for a second. Because George actually did not consider himself a political comedian at all

matt nappo 52:51
I know. And really,

Paul Provenza 52:53
you look at his material. It’s not really about personalities, or issues, per se. It’s not really about like current events. It’s bigger, bigger treatments of you know, like, Yes, we’ll talk about abortion, but it’s not really about abortion. It’s about you know, the power structure. You know, he wasn’t as opposed to somebody, like a more Saul who literally talked about the news of the day. And George never saw and I know, he’s, you know, I’ve had this conversation with him. He literally never thought of himself as a political comedian at all.

matt nappo 53:25
I get that. And he was more of a, you know, commentate commentary on the government and how when he when he went there at all, it was about the system. Sure, yeah. Culture, right.

Paul Provenza 53:39
And, and, and language and how that impacts culture and society and all that stuff. They’re bigger things than you know, being about the news or being about current topics there. By the time. I mean, there’s nothing that Carlin talked about in any way that you might refer to as politically, there’s nothing that he talked about 30 years ago, that isn’t valid today. Right? You know, it’s like watching bill when I watched Bill Hicks, I’m like, holy shit, this could have been written last week, you know? So there’s a big difference between what they’re doing and what more Saul did and even Lenny Bruce, I mean, Lenny Bruce was a little bit of a mix of both or Lenny Bruce would talk about specific current events and he’ll mention certain you know, people that are, you know, obscure to us now but at the time we’re in the you know, in the news every day, or like Robert Klein’s mind over matter album, the whole second side of that album is all Watergate. Right and a lot of it still resonates but I mean, it was he’ll talk specifically about individual characters like Senator Stennis or Rosemary woods or people that were in the news every day, but are obscure to us now. Because that car Yeah, that neither

matt nappo 54:51
fire. No, I get it. But where I was going with that is that there was a period of time and a comedy is always had that ability to come in. on politics, but now what we’re seeing, I think, which is different is that comedy has become the subject of politics in a lot of ways. And that that’s a really confusing thing for me. And in your mind, do you? First of all, we agree. And second of all, is it a good thing or bad thing? Because I’m looking at this fallout from Chappelle stuff, and he is now front and center a political issue himself. He’s a stand up comedian. Yeah. Now he’s not just commenting on political issues. He is a political issue.

Paul Provenza 55:33
Remember this ever happening before is certainly not in my lifetime. It but it that relates to what I was talking about before how, you know, this is a time where audiences care about comedy in a different way. It is amazing that somebody act can become a political touchstone. I mean, that was, you know, I mean, more was more saw wish that happened when he was doing his Kennedy Assassination obsession, you know, period there. Yeah. But he wish that, you know, things that he said will become political footballs. No, I it is remarkable. It is remarkable. But what it does speak to, is, how the art of comedy is being felt seen and appreciated differently than ever before. I mean, what you know, it just, it just, it’s kind of a fantasy of mine. I mean, I always I remember, many years ago, talking about how boy, I wish comedy got taken more seriously, you know, and, I mean, I sort of met not only as in terms of like news, but just as an art form. You know, it’s like, I feel like comedy appreciation should be taught at universities the same way music appreciation is you can track movements, and artists and art and you know, all that stuff. It’s just, it’s so rich and interesting. I always felt like comedy deserved more respect and appreciation in that regard, and that’s kind of what’s happening now. And I guess this, this is the weird flip side of that good thing, the good thing being that people are really seeing it as an art form that has an impact. And that does matter. And I think that’s disconcerting for comics. Because it’s really hard. It’s a hard line to walk when you’re a comic, because I’m one point. You know, at one point, we understand we’ve devoted our lives to an art form that it obviously has to have some meaning and significance to us, but at the same time, take itself seriously. And that’s one of the really compelling things about comedy is that it always operates in these weird dissonances. Everything about it is dissonant, that’s why it’s it’s it’s a masterful art form to me, because it’s so hard to pin down. You know, it’s a good joke, a pretty melody. Yeah, but at the same time, there’s also all these other cultural and social things, there’s a real relationship to an audience, you know, the thing about stand up is there’s nothing between you and the recipient, even with something like music. You know, a musician has music between them and the recipient, right? how they interpret that, how they feel that whatever. But you know, with a comedian, it’s literally it’s you, your voice, the things you say. So there’s a certain immediacy to it, that puts you in that place where well, if you’re going to, if it’s going to be important to you, then you’re going to have to, you know, take the flip side of that, which is people, we’re going to have issues about what your points of view are, you know, it’s so it’s a very, very, very complex art form on so many levels. But right now, it’s particularly particularly interesting. So I guess to answer your question, I never seen anything like it before. And I think ultimately, it’s a good thing. I think all the conversations that provokes without even saying they’re things that agree with things that I don’t agree with, I fall, you know, personally, I fall on in different ways on different people you might mention or different issues that come up in comedy that you might mention, but I absolutely think that the conversations around all of it are crucial. I think they’re great. I think they’re conversations we should have been having for the last 50 years.

matt nappo 59:08
You know, I I tend to agree with you. But he come back to this image in my mind of me being a kid, my parents were very hardcore, right wingers. I mean, they’re, you know, they were Nixon people. And they were fans of the Smothers Brothers. They were fans of George Carlin, they were fans of Vic Gregory, and could appreciate that comedy, even though they were diametrically opposed to their politics. You don’t see that. That’s rare. Yeah. In today’s world, you don’t see that at all. You’ll see people will, you know, basically boycott any art form any artists in any discipline, because they don’t like their politics. You know, people who didn’t like Robert De Niro who loved his movies all their whole lives. All of a sudden, he says something politically that they don’t like I’m not watching any of his movies again. That’s I think something nil? No.

Paul Provenza 1:00:05
I think so too. I agree with you. I think so. But you know, here’s the odd thing is that it starts to articulate and it’s the first time I’m, I’m trying to, but I think there’s this I think what’s happened is, you know, the news, entertainment, politics, show business, they’ve all become one in the same, right? I think that this is, this is a sort of illustration of that is that well, all the things that you might, you would, you would hope that you would hold a politician, you know, hold their feet to the fire for things that they said publicly, you know, man, now you’re doing it to comedians. And, you know, I it’s all emerged, it’s all become one. And and I think that this is a result of that. I mean, you know, people remember people talking about this many, many years ago about how you know, infotainment was a thing, and how news and entertainment were becoming becoming blurred, and you could see it happening on television, you can see a local news shows where all of a sudden have these, you know, elaborate graphics and things. And, you know, I mean, by the time of the first Gulf War in the early 90s, it was full blown, you know, but this this meshing of entertainment and information and entertainment and current events and news, they’ve become inseparable to me. I mean, what’s going on in, you know, with a lot of these republican extremists like, like bow birds and green and cawthorne. They’re not doing anything government related. It’s all

matt nappo 1:01:36
showbusiness. Right? Yeah. You

Paul Provenza 1:01:39
know, their, their, what’s their political, what’s their agenda in terms of policy, they’re not doing any of that.

matt nappo 1:01:46
They never get into real issues or any of that kind of stuff. It is all like catchphrases, and, you know, bumper sticker

Paul Provenza 1:01:54
culture, and how much exposure they can get to which people, you know, at which point is it going to stick under, you know, get under somebody’s skin. But but it’s not about about government, and and, or governing, I should say, and so I think that what you’re talking about is just more of that, I think it’s it kind of comes with the territory of what’s happened now.

matt nappo 1:02:17
Yeah, good point. And are you an optimist for for, you know, our nation for the world that always stuff because when I look at it, I gotta tell you, I’m a pessimist. But I just want to get you, you know, outlook on the big picture for, for the future. For what

Paul Provenza 1:02:35
it’s worth, and I am no expert on anything. But for what it’s worth, I can’t play anybody here into game theory, and they can actually run these run these, you know, these outcomes. I just don’t see any outcome that doesn’t end in Civil War. Yeah,

matt nappo 1:02:55
I agree. I agree. It’s positive or

Paul Provenza 1:02:59
negative. I couldn’t even tell you anymore.

matt nappo 1:03:03
I agree. I may. It’s pretty scary. Well, it’s all I can say. Yeah, no, I Well, you know, I want to say it’s refreshing to hear somebody agree with me on that. But it’s really scary to hear somebody agree with me on that, oh, let’s move on. Because I don’t want to make this that political, this time bomb when people get on. Directing. And because we can’t you kind of alluded to this before, when you were talking about the green room and getting you had a certain look and atmosphere and all that kind of stuff that you wanted there. And bringing you all the way up to ironwolf. It’s your most recent project, the last shot and Andy Anderson, how that came about and your approach to directing a stand up special in today’s days.

Paul Provenza 1:03:53
Well, you know, it, I don’t have studios, you know, asking me to work for them. I don’t have projects being brought to me as soon as everything I do is really DIY. and I have been friends with Andy for quite some time. And I’ve been working for, I think, a million years now on a documentary about an aspect of Andy’s life, which we’ll get to in a minute, but in the intervening period there Andy said hey, I got some people together we’re gonna shoot a special edition your dog’s house dog Stan hopes place in Bisbee. And he has this little I guess somebody else might call it a man cave. It’s where you know, he and his friends get together and watch

matt nappo 1:04:38
COVID a man cave on the show. Yeah.

Paul Provenza 1:04:43
Because the funhouse and it’s just a little space and it seats maybe, you know, at best 5060 people talk 40 4050 people tops. It’s a tiny little thing and every once in a while, he’ll do stand up shows there. And and he was like, this is where we can shoot it, like, Well, okay, so we got a bunch of kids together who were just out of film school. And they just came and shot this thing and everybody was drunk or high half the time. But Andy did a great, great show. And because it was DIY, you know, my feeling is we can’t make it look like it’s not DIY. And what’s the point of that? Let’s own it. And let’s go, you know, Andy’s a kind of an underground cat. I mean, you know, he’s not for everybody. I think he’s absolutely brilliant. I think some of the things that he does in that special are so challenging, and I think that he’s still a lovable cat talking about this stuff, and just loses, loses, you know, this vibe of, Oh, I just want to hug the guy. You know, he’s talking about the fact that his mother is a rape baby. And and I just, I just, I just, he’s so endearing. You know, it’s wild. And he’s a very interesting cat. And he’s a beautiful guy. He doesn’t you know, he’s not a hostile, aggressive person at all. But he talks about, you know, you can see why he’s duck Stan Hope’s favorite comic, he talks about things in a way that nobody else can talk about. And, and he’s brilliantly funny. But so we just said, let’s see what we can do. And I was like, you know, I wanted all of these cameras to be handheld because again, it was a tiny little space, tiny little room. Yo, Andy needs to be you never know what he’s gonna do or say next. And so the camera work is kind of all over the place, but it kind of feels right for the moment because it reloads literally, we’re not, we’re not trying to pretend that this was, you know, a $200,000 HBO shoot. This was a bunch of monkeys with cameras, you know, shooting a really funny guy. So that was my approach to it. And we had some technical problems. It was a lot of footage we couldn’t use. And as a result, it kind of has this vibe of i will i don’t know you described I think it’s kind of punky

matt nappo 1:07:12
I think it looks like an artistic approach. And you know, I didn’t, at the time I commented to somebody said, look at this, what makes it different than any other comedy special you’ve ever seen. And you brought it up before, but my friend who I was showing it to, he said, right away, he said, you never see the audience’s faces. You see the back of their heads, you never see a cutaway to the audience. And you talked about it before. And that was unusual. I said, Yeah, you’re right. I didn’t pick up on that. But you mentioned the handheld stuff. Is there a steady cam because that the movement seems extremely steady. If you had some really good college hunks with, with strong arms to hold that camera really steady? Or you had a steady cam on it because it feels like it’s got like a magical artistic quality to it. Whether it happened by accident or your intentional design, it feels like that I want to be in this room.

Paul Provenza 1:08:10
Well, that is a joy for me to hear. Thank you so much for for being kind about it. But it really was driven by what do we have you know? And no, there was no steady cam there was nothing there was no every camera was different. So you know, matching the footage is was a real challenge. But as you said you wanted to be in that room. And that’s the vibe that I wanted to create. Yeah, I just that feeling of and that’s why you do see the audience from the back of their heads because again, I put the camera in the audience, I wanted it to feel like you’re in this space. That’s it’s it’s undefined. You don’t really know where it is. You’re not really sure who’s in the room. You don’t know how big it is. It’s just an experience and and it actually looks much richer than I expected it to you know, in terms of the what we had no lights, which is all lights that were in the room that debt, Doug has watches football games in all DIY, absolutely. There were virtually no concessions to any sort of a shoot really made at all. Authenticity is a big part of what I what is meaningful to me. That’s what was the big part of the greenroom as well, was the authenticity of really, truly not having you know, not having planned anything in any way more than just it’s able to get whatever happens. You know, on the greenroom, the Congress, the show starts mid conversation. When the audience is actually you know, when it’s funny because when the budget came down from Showtime, there was a certain amount of money in there for what they call audience services. Which are the people who go to if you’re waiting online at Universal Studios, they’ll say hey, you want to come to TV taping tonight, people go okay. And they show up. And they know what anything about what they’re doing. They’re just, it’s just an event. I was like, we’re not getting an audience service. And everybody that was invited to come to the taping was for my personal email list, my producing partner, Barbara Romans personal email list, and some people who work in on the show and a bunch of comics personal email list. So everybody was in the audience of the greenroom. But 90% of his, they got to bring guests, of course, but you know, 90% of the people that were in that room, spend time in green rooms, right, that aspect of authenticity, that I thought, well, nobody else can do that. I’m doing that for sure. You know, which is why you have this weird thing of like, there’s an audience there, but there’s not an audience there. And most of the comics when they, you know, as the audience, we were seated already talking as the audience came in and sat down. Because we want them to feel like oh, they’re coming into a room. That’s all. There’s a thing happening right now just walk into a green room, there’s a thing happening every time you walk into a green room. And they found their seats wherever they were. And most of the people who were on the show, they knew people that were in every audience. Yeah, cars were real. They were people who you’d find in the greenroom. So I’m always sort of, I’m always looking for what what are the little ways that I can help you know, create an express some authenticity, and and that’s a lot of what went on in shooting Andy special is, is I know, a lot of people will do a stand up special, your people you’ve never heard of. And maybe they’re saying them specials that break them, break them out, and they become big stars from them, or whatever the case may be. But a lot of people you’ve never heard of do Sam specials in 3000 seat theaters. Right? Like what’s the point of that? Exactly? That’s a lie.

matt nappo 1:11:57
Yeah, yeah, exactly. Yeah. And you you’re getting all your friends and relatives to fill those empty seats or whatever to make it work. And then pumping in some some canned applause and laughter and all that kind of stuff. Just Yeah, that’s um, you know, a fanfic. And you’re absolutely right.

Paul Provenza 1:12:13
When we were doing the audio on any special, which again, because it was DIY, you know, we didn’t have a sophisticated audio setup. You know, we had a few things. Greg Charlie, who is on Doug’s team, he did some great stuff for us, but but you know, we had to go in and mix the show properly, so that it just wasn’t, you know, totally like, you know, there’s nothing going on in this thing that’s not professional. But, So Jeremy grody, who did the audio on the greenroom, did the audio on that special? And I told him I said, I want to hear the audience’s comments on the ship that Andy’s doing. Because you know, Andy will do some bits These are people in the audience that are fans of his and you’ll hear them go Oh, Andy, no, please. You know, I want to hear that I want to hear that you can be an Andy fan and still feel those things. Yeah. Oh, that Andy Andy is is he’s even pushing the boundaries for people that like him already. You know, I really I want all that I just felt that that was more authentic.

matt nappo 1:13:21
That’s absolutely true. And that Tandy, I mean, if you listen to his weekly podcast issues with Andy, by the way, you’ll get that every single week as a big fan of his I will listen to that podcast and I believe three or four times during every single episode. Oh man, can you really

Paul Provenza 1:13:40
know? Yeah. Because because he’s so like, not PC, right? But that’s not a fair way to describe him. Because if you watch his special if you watch last shot, like he does material, that’s anti corporatism, he does material that’s anti homophobia. He does material that’s anti anti trans. He does material that’s, you know, some like really left wing kind of perspectives, but those kind of left right things fall away. Either way he does it and then but then he’ll do you know, the story about rape, which is, you know, as on PC as you can get right now, but do you want to hug him at the end of the story? Yeah, absolutely. And it’s not it’s not, you know, he’s not just doing it for shock value. When you find out his personal connection to it as the bit goes on. It just it just fucks with your head. Right. And, And that, to me is some really, really great comedy. Though, it’s like you can’t even classify him as you know, he’s, he’s one of those legion of skanks guys because he, you know, does this rape story or he’s one of the he’s not any of those things. Now,

matt nappo 1:14:54
I think it’s unfortunate that a lot of you because you just mentioned can’t even classify I think there’s a lot of clicking this in the comedy world right now where you people are in camps. And I don’t think that’s necessarily a good thing. Because what you represent to me is that, again, that’s 66 Degrees of Separation prevented, you were kind of like welcoming to so many people and, and especially on those shows that you did where you brought it. You know, Robin Williams and Bo Burnham. That’s a lot to bleep from those two, you know, so you had, you know, that knocking down the walls in comedy, and more than a lot of people are building them up these days. But you mentioned a documentary you’re working on. Let’s talk about that a little bit. And what’s what because people want to know, you know, you say you’ve been working on forever. I know a lot of people have asked me, you guys, documentary waves are coming out, they’re eager to see it for free forever. What’s up with it?

Paul Provenza 1:15:53
When they see I don’t know why it’s very, very challenging thing the story of it is it’s basically the story, the background to it. And ultimately, it’s the story of Andy with the help of Doug Stan hope and a couple of other comedian friends Chris castle, French every they tracked down and confronted on camera, and he’s childhood molester. And it’s so it’s the story of why this matters to him actually going and doing it. And then what happened as a result of it. And it’s really tricky project because it’s a comedy. It’s like, Hi, it’s like, comedy, Mount Everest is trying to make something funny that that isn’t funny at all. Which to me is, you know, that’s the the physics definition of work is you exert a force on something, and it moves or changes direction, right? That’s what you that’s the kind of comedy that interests me more than this stuff that’s like, Hey, did you ever notice when you find funny things that are already out there, as valuable as that is nothing wrong with that, there’s not as interesting to me as taking something that’s unfunny and figuring out how to make it funny. And the reason that I that I can do that with this story is because Andy has already done that, and he has made it funny. That’s the way he has processed this pain for himself that resulted from from this experience in his life. But it wasn’t enough, he felt like he really needed to say something to this guy. And so it’s it’s this, it’s Andy being funny about it. But it’s also me being very serious and honest and truthful about it. And it ultimately is, there’s a lot of lenses through which to see the story. One is the lens through the lens of comedy, which interests me, of course, is that this is really how comedy is born of pain right here. Right, right. The other thing is, this is a different way of dealing with something that’s hard to deal with, that you don’t really have a paradigm for, anytime any anything about this subject is presented, it’s presented in a very morose way. Not that it’s not important. And not that feeling isn’t genuine for a lot of people. But it’s not necessarily the only way to deal with this. And you know, Christine Veen is in, it appears in the movie as well. And she talks about, you know, having dealt with her own stuff through making the making comedy out of it, and stuff like that. And so this is a thing that a lot of people just don’t have a paradigm for. But it means that you might be the kind of person that doesn’t have to look at this as something as morose and horrible as it is, it doesn’t mean that it was an important and meaningful and tragic thing that happened to you, but you don’t have to stay in that place. And so there’s that lens to which is all these different way of dealing with this kind of trauma. So there’s a lot of a lot of levels upon which this story operates. And what I’m just trying to do is just tell this story, with all of those aspects of it being present, right? You can put however you want, but

matt nappo 1:19:16
it’s a challenge to editing is that the challenge is editing all the stuff that you’ve gotten or Yeah.

Paul Provenza 1:19:25
No, it’s it’s, it’s the editing because I’m basically working with found footage. They again was Chris castles and Frank Chevrolet. They were shooting stuff for months and months and months around this. They were just shooting. There was nobody at the helm. It was just let’s just shoot, you know. So I came into the project and the only thing I was involved in shooting were a handful of interviews with some of Andy’s family members and a couple of friends. That that’s it. So basically most of what I’m telling the story with is found footage to me. It started They already got that with no agenda, or no, you know, they had no ark in mind. They had no, they were just shooting. So once again, it’s really authentic, that they weren’t shooting this really with any sort of plan to do anything with it, they were just shooting it, they were hoping they could do something with it. But once again, it’s totally DIY, right? So that’s, that’s why it’s taking so long, it’s like, there’s so much that does come out of the footage that’s already been shot. There’s so much that does come out and to figure out what’s meaningful and what’s important relative to some of the other stuff. But there is no outline in what they shot.

matt nappo 1:20:40
Gotcha. Yeah, so speaking of plans, is there a plan for a discrete distribution when it is finally done? like where are you gonna? Cuz I would think that’s tricky, too, because of the subject matter and what it is we can you add this to and obviously no network is going to touch it with a 10 foot pole.

Paul Provenza 1:21:01
And again, it’s another situation where it’s not you know, it’s DIY, it’s very punk. There’s no actual production values to anything. Yeah. So yeah, the answer is, I don’t know but it’s a phenomenal story that deserves to be told. And it’s it’s shocking how funny Andy is even in the midst of what he’s really really truly feeling very deeply, you know, has affected his life and for the for the worse, even with all of that Andy is still really really funny about it all. And I just think it’s a great story that needs to be told and we’ll just see, you know, a long time ago I decided that I had no career there is no arc there is no linearity at all. I decided that at some point I’m just going to be project to project and just whatever happens happens it’s like you know, I in my romanticized vision of it it’s like you know, I’m I’m in a French ghera you know, French Garret painting a painting or making a sculpture out of found objects or, or you know, whatever it may be and something might end up in the Museum of Modern Art or something might get sold or something might just end up you know, being thrown away when I’m dead. I have no idea I just doing the projects that fall on my heart and this is what I mean. Hey,

matt nappo 1:22:19
I got I got cat so it looks like he or she I don’t know what the he or she but it looks like she wants us to wrap this up. But Tom, that I’m not we’re not quite there yet. likes to be. Speaking of that, I’m glad you went there because I wanted to talk to you about this. And I don’t know I don’t want to sound like I’m blowing smoke up your ass. But when it comes to legacy, and I was thinking about and we mentioned Bill Hicks a couple of times in his program. Bill Hicks is a legend. He was funny, and I loved him. But people use that word legend because he died young. I know smoke again, I think you’re in the same level as Bill Hicks. The only reason people don’t say the Paul provenza the legend is because you’re alive. But they think about legacy and all that kind of stuff. You know, and not just his

Paul Provenza 1:23:08
studio. network or studio?

matt nappo 1:23:13
Well, I do have a production crew he is but No, but seriously, do you think about legacy at all, because, you know, you’ve done a lot of great things and I consider you like a renaissance man, as far as you know, going from, from stand up to author and director and filmmaker and all this kind of stuff and taking your own path. You have your own voice in, in, in directing films to so it’s not like you’re copying anybody. I you know, I look up to you as a role model. And for a lot of reasons. But legacy do you think about that?

Paul Provenza 1:23:53
Wow, first of all, thank you. I’m honored by your comments. And in terms of legacy, I do but not in an obvious way. Like I don’t really, I don’t really know there’s so much out there. There’s so many every day that goes by I’m like, I can’t believe how much shit there is. There’s so much shit. sports news, it was spoken in art and music and it this is so much shit. It just never stops, like how much shit can we have? It just never stopped. I’m a little overwhelmed by all of it. So I don’t really think that I you know, I don’t think of legacy in terms of what people are going to remember being that. I don’t care also, because who cares? We’re just you know, we’re on a pebble, you know, revolving around the sun and there’s way bigger forces at work in us. We’re very self important. I don’t care about any of that. But where I do feel like I do think a bit about legacy is that everything that I’ve been doing for about 15 or 20 years now. There came a point in my life where I was like, You know what? I’m just not as gifted enough, you know, I’m not I’m not as gifted enough to, I’m not gifted enough to change the art form from the stand up that I do. I just feel like I can’t really contribute to the art form in any meaningful way, by doing this thing that I do, you know, if I were Maria Bamford, I would feel very differently about that, you know, if I were Dave Chappelle, I would feel differently about that. If I were you, Louie ck, I would feel differently about that, I would feel like I had a shot. But I don’t, I’m just not that gifted. However, all this other stuff that you’re talking about is, is it pretty, pretty much my own voice, and it’s pretty unique. So I decided that I wanted to give back to comedy, which saved my life as a child, I wanted to give back to comedy in some way, it wasn’t going to come through doing stand up per se, for me, it would come from all these other projects, if it’s going to come from any place. And I decided, everything that I did everything that I worked on, I was doing for me at the age of 14, that someday, some kid at the age of around 13 1415 is going to see this stuff, and it’s going to make a difference in his or her life. That’s the extent of legacy that I think about everything I do. Everything that I’ve done for the last 20 years has been stuff that I would have gone bananas over if I discovered it when I was 14 years old.

matt nappo 1:26:30
Yeah. Wow, that’s really cool. Really cool stuff. You know, as you were saying that I was thinking about something I noticed in like on the internet, you will see prodigy musicians now, because you mentioned 1314, we see I see, prodigy, many musicians who are just like, you know, incredible talent at 45 years old every single day, our music, you know, that’s impossible in comedy, isn’t it to say, where if you saw a five or six year old blowing them away, stand up comedy with that, like shock, shock, you

Paul Provenza 1:27:03
know, that’s, that’s a series Barbara Roman, my partner and I tried to sell several times over several periods of time, tried to sell this, because, you know, most people who are prodigies at comedy are getting in trouble for being good at what they do. Wow. The age of 10 or 12 problem maker, right? They’re not, they’re not rewarded. They’re not celebrated like somebody who was a prodigy in athletics or music or art. And that’s part of it. And so this project that we tried to do was basically about you know, showing some love to the people who are prodigies in comedy at a young age and introducing them to the world of comedy and mentoring them yeah, it’s not something that happens I think because of that because

matt nappo 1:27:58
point I never even considered that but you’re absolutely right they get punished for for being good at what they do if you’re if you’re too good at comedy too young it’s frowned upon and you get smacked you’re a wiseass you’re a punk Shut the hell up that kind of stuff. Where if you’re a musician they encourage you Wow incredible Yeah, incredible insight. Well, I I’m gonna let you go but I can’t let you go because until I bring this up I’ve noticed during this interview, are you having a unlit cigarette in your hand and my mind goes back to you lecturing Bill Hicks about smoking Are you smoking now

Paul Provenza 1:28:35
I’ve decided to commit slow suicide

matt nappo 1:28:40
well you know i by the drop that’s what that’s what that’s what it is suicide by the drop right we’re all doing it we’re all getting one what I just said surprised me to see that that’s all because I remember that very clearly is you’ve given Hicks like some shit for having a cigarette on you. So I’m lit well good for you. Well, I appreciate your time here and I wish you great success with everything nature jack calm by the way to get the Last Waltz. And you know last shot I’m sorry, The Last Waltz that’s another great documentary but it’s Yeah.

Paul Provenza 1:29:18
The last was not that funny. Yeah. Oh,

matt nappo 1:29:22
anything new that besides the documentary you’re working on that we want people know about enough.

Paul Provenza 1:29:28
setlist is back on stage. We’re doing setlist in Los Angeles again. The first one since pandemic hit just last month, and we’re doing it monthly at the improv lab on Melrose. Lastly, the first one we did we came back at Eddie Pepitone and a bunch of bunch of people. It’s great fun. setlist is another one of those things that you know, if I have a 14 hour day, we’ll go crazy over

matt nappo 1:29:59
remar Trouble in that when I when I first learned that you were doing that, I thought there’s no way if there’s not enough comedians that have the chops to just, you know, let the audience pick what they’re going to talk about that stuff. I thought Robin Williams Of course, and maybe Drew Carey and

Paul Provenza 1:30:16
but you know it’s not it’s not the audience it’s not the audience. They are given the premise of to those your viewers who don’t aren’t familiar, the premise of setlist This is a format created by the brilliant, brilliant, brilliant evil genius Troy Conrad. And we partnered together and I took it around the world and took it on the international festival circuit. It’s been here, because this is the thing is that the impulse of it works in any country. We’ve done it in Argentina, we’ve done it in China, we’ve done in Egypt. It’s wild anyway, the premise of it is Troy Conrad, we usually it’s Troy, create a setlist and we give it to the comedian while they’re on stage in front of the audience, and they have to make up the set along with it.

matt nappo 1:31:04
I was under the impression you were polling the audience for those.

Paul Provenza 1:31:10
that the reason that that distinction is important is because what you get from the audience generally is two dimensional stuff. And it tends to be stuff that they are familiar with, like it could be a current events reference or it’s a dick joke, or it’s something that you know, it’s really sort of pedestrian, but what we create for the setlist are more complicated than that. And they’re coming from other comedians. So there’s juice in this thing, if you can find it, it’s up to you to figure out how to get in there. You know, so it’s the topics are crafted. They’re not random at all. Right? So their challenges, and that’s why we’ve had people like Eddie Izzard, get up and do it. And Robin Williams, and Roseanne and to mention, and some of the biggest names in comedy have gotten up and do it, to do it, because they get what an incredible challenge it is, and how fun it is. It’s like skydiving. It’s really it’s so scary. It’s so frightening, especially for somebody who’s got, you know, a reputation at stake. But once they do it, they’re like, oh, man, this is great, right? You know, Rob, bank us all the time for letting him do what he goes and just change my month just now doing this show tonight, you know, Eddie is in the middle of one setlist set. And he’s doing great too. But at one point, he gets a topic and he turns to the earnings and just goes This is fucking hard. And it’s like, it’s it’s, it’s more than just random stuff. It’s a real challenge. And the comedians who do it are brave. And I think they trust us that we never make them look bad. And that’s one of the things we did it as a series in the UK, we did 14 episodes of it for what was sky Atlantic at the time. And we haven’t been able to sell it in the United States. And it’s very frustrating. But one of the reasons that we didn’t sell it, we have a lot of interest, but the American concerns that wanted to do it all want to make it a competition. And we said absolutely not. It’s the antithesis. The whole point is that there is no judgment. You just it’s just let’s see what happens. It’s a celebration of the creative process, not about a victory or a failure or winning or competing. The comics aren’t competing against each other. They’re competing against the list.

matt nappo 1:33:29
In suits ruin everything, man. I’m telling you, they just don’t get it. But I get it. Yeah, no, there’s no I hate competition in any art form. You know, that whole idea of making it a competition? It then it should be sports, you know, sports and things. Keep your competition over there. And yeah, well, I’m sorry to hear that. Because there was a great idea. And I can imagine

Paul Provenza 1:33:58
Angeles at the improv every month at the improv lab and it’ll pop up again and actually TJ Miller was doing it as his closing of his show he did a week at the Irvine improv and he closed his show with like a 15 minute setlist segment every night. So you may be or that and we did a we did a full Rick Overton did a full one hour special in the setlist format which is available if you click over 10 plus setlist you’ll find it online and he’s a Maestro and watching him work is like going to you know comedy college watching you do setlist in particular because he doesn’t have the bit yet you watch find it and

matt nappo 1:34:41
wow hope we just locked up. Big we’re froze up. Well that’s a shame. We’re getting to the point where we’re gonna close up view that Paul Yeah. Now the phone is telling us you know what You guys got to wrap it up we have the people render on there

looks like he’s still connected anyway folks I’ll just edit this out did it the day to day that that that that that that that need to add it there you are yeah there you go yeah so yeah

Paul Provenza 1:35:38
the records if you if you google Rick Overton and setlist you should be able to get his setlist one hour special and watching him you know work is like going to comedy college and also we did we did a couple of them nowhere comedy shows we did one with Gilbert Godfrey where he just Gilbert doing setlist for an hour so that was great. We hope we’re hoping to do more of that with Gilbert. We’re hoping to do a whole tour of Gilbert just every night doing setlist that’s it no prepared material just Gilbert with setlist

matt nappo 1:36:15
what a gift to the world that would be I know he’s so funny

Paul Provenza 1:36:19
and watching Gilbert try and find the joke, right? There’s nothing funnier. There’s nothing funnier even if he doesn’t find it which is rare if ever right it’s hilarious watch try and find so that’s the thing so the audience’s that come out they know that this is a real challenge to comedians and they know that the comedians are really on the heels and so they really they tend to be really supportive they tend to be like yeah come on we’ll pull in for you We know you can make us laugh You know

matt nappo 1:36:43
no heckling at the setlist I get it. Yeah, cuz they’re all they’re all rooting for the underdog, because even the best comics in the world become an underdog in that. Great stuff. Well, I do appreciate your time here. And I wish you great success moving forward. And please let me know when and if the anti documentary comes out. So I can Oh, well, yeah. Well, getting there. Thanks for Thanks for coming. And, you know, please don’t please come back to great and fabulous Paul provenza. Great, great guy, great insights in there some really important things for me to think about there, you know, and what comes across is very clearly his his love and admiration and respect for the art form. And as he mentioned in his commentary on that is, it can be a double edged sword, when you have that much respect and admiration. A lot of comedians start out basically imitating their heroes. And so with that being lost on the younger generation, to some degree, we do have a lot more original voices and people who are able, because they don’t have that influence, to really take things in a very unique and new direction. So I just love to hear your thoughts on it. Please write to me at info at my bookkeeping. I can’t tell you who’s on the next program because this is pre taped, folks. So I don’t know when exactly this is going to hit next at this point. So I hope you enjoyed this program. Until next time, I’m Matt nappo. Thanks for coming. Have a great day and bye for now. What you want round

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On Monday, October 11th, 2021, The great Henry Phillips popped in to delight Minddog and his listeners with talk about music, filmmaking, acting, and story telling in general.

And welcome my friends to yet another episode of the mind dog TV podcast. I’m Matt nappo Thanks for coming. It’s great to have you here as always got the great Henry folks with me tonight. I’m gonna bring him in just one minute just before I bring him in No, I just because I Henry has a habit of getting misconstrued in the press and stuff like that. So I want to bear all the responsibility for these comments, and no weight on Henry at all. For the racist and homophobic things I’m about to say. Really not just the happy indigenous peoples day, if you still call it Columbus Day, good for you. But it’s also Coming Out Day. And it just occurs to me. I mean, first of all, there’s no indigenous people want to call people who got here before the white Europeans that’s more accurate. So it’s happy people got here before the white Europeans day, Columbus was not Italian. So my Italian friends who just feel like they’ve been cheated out of a day to celebrate Italian heritage, Italian, whatever it is ancestry. Columbus was an Italian and he sailed for Spain. So get over that. The other part is National Coming Out there, which I’m all for. Everybody’s got a day, but 365 days in a year. We shouldn’t be competing over days. I mean, there has to be another day pick tomorrow. Pick yesterday, yesterday wasn’t a day that I knew about anyway. So we’re just causing a lot of conflict and a lot of unnecessary bs going around about whose day it is and all that stuff, but happy whatever day it is Monday night, and I got Henry Philips you know, Henry Philips, if you don’t know I almost want to tell you You shouldn’t be listening or watching this live stream shouldn’t be listening to my podcast, if you don’t know who Henry Henry Philips was born to be a rock star. But I think and we’ll find out about this but I think his humility and his sense of humor are what caused him to change his life cost and direction and career choice slightly ever so slightly. He is a rock star of sorts, but he is a singer, songwriter. troubadour extraordinaire, filmmaker, writer actor probably a bunch of other things I want to say chef but I don’t want to say let’s just say he’s a cooking show hosts and leave it at that Ladies and gentlemen, please open your ears open your minds and help me welcome in the fabulous Henry folks in mind on TV pockets Henry welcome.

Henry Phillips 4:21
Hey, thanks for having me.

matt nappo 4:23
It’s my pleasure to have you now as I mentioned I think you were born to be a rock star you got a great voice I know you probably you’re very humble about that and might argue with me about that but I think you had a great voice great ear for melody and good player and it seems like you were born to be a rock star. Do you agree with that at all?

Henry Phillips 4:44
Thanks. I was gonna say I your your intro and not everybody. I can’t say this about everybody but your intro was really pretty accurate. I was just like, yeah, you know, the sense of humor and everything sort of took me away from that and the humility of course, because being a

rock star is all about flamboyance and you know, muscle on your way in front of the crowd and standing out. And I’ve always been pretty bad at those things. So that that might be why I sort of ended up doing what I’m doing. But uh, but I appreciate that. Yeah, music is a huge first love for me. And I can tell you’re into it, too, with all those guitars in the back. And

I yeah, I’ll never stop doing it. So anything that I do, I always try to figure out how I can get the music in there. But right, but the rock star thing didn’t pan out for me.

matt nappo 5:31
Well, let’s talk. Yeah, and rock star is overrated and a lot of ways and I think you are a rock star of sorts in your own world right now I don’t I think you’ve got the market cornered on what you do, because there are a lot of guys who go out there with a guitar in a comedy club. But as you kind of alluded to in one of the, the films I’m not, I look at them as like one film right now like the Godfather saga. Yeah, Henry saga. But you kind of alluded to the fact that there are a lot of guys, and without naming any names or bashing anybody. There are a lot of guys out there with guitars. But more a lot of them are doing parody and stuff like this and not doing necessarily what you do. So I think you are a rock star in creating a whole new comedy genre, musical genre. So congratulations.

merch

Henry Phillips 6:21
Thanks. Well, yeah, I mean, it’s been, I guess, gosh, we’re going into the third decade now. You know, I mean, I think it was probably like 92 are something that I was hanging out with all musicians and I would crack my buddies and my bandmates up by just playing the guitar and kind of doing sort of a foe love song or something. But I’d read newspaper headlines or, or I would just sort of throw in a line in there about, you know, that you would never hear in a soft ballot or something like that. And then, yeah, my friend started saying, you really got to go up there and do this at open mic nights around town. And I never would have done it if it weren’t for friends of mine pushing me to do it.

matt nappo 7:05
You know, you mentioned going through the headlines and stuff and one thing I’m noticing about you is I don’t not sure if you’re reading lyrics or something, it seems to me, you make it as hard as possible on yourself. And Bob Dylan wise, with so many words to remember, I mean, I want to learn one of your songs. I couldn’t do it I don’t think I can do without relying on the lyrics or a teleprompter for year is I know you make it rough on yourself. I think how do you remember all

Henry Phillips 7:35
your right and I’m and I’m lazy about it too. Because like once I’ve got it in my brain, and like I have a couple of songs that are like ripped from today’s headlines and, and I’ll memorize them and then in order to do in order to update it, like it should be updated. I have to memorize it again. And I can’t do it sometimes. So I wound up doing the old version of fitness starts sounding dated. But yeah, it’s not easy. I mean, it’s just like anything else you have to just put in the time you know, if you say something to yourself over and over again for an hour straight while you’re staring at the wall. You probably can eventually bang it into your head but it nobody wants to do that. I don’t want to do it. But um, but you’re right. I have a there’s YouTube clips of me on the radio, doing songs and just screwing up halfway through and I’ll look at it and I’ll cringe I’ll be like, Oh, come on. Why didn’t you just learn the lyrics before he got on the radio? Wow,

matt nappo 8:30
I haven’t seen any. I mean, I’ve seen so much of your work. Unless I just it goes by me and because

Henry Phillips 8:36
I try to make a joke out of it. I’m like, you know, yeah, like as if that’s part of the joke or suddenly you know, but yeah,

matt nappo 8:45
yeah. And it seems to me that you know, the beauty of it is you’re listening to all the words so if you add live or impromptu or change a line here and there, there’s no way I because you have so many words in the song. There’s no way I’m gonna call you on it. Anyway. There

Henry Phillips 9:00
you go. Yeah. Well, a lot of times when in the middle of the live show, I’ll just sort of improv something a little bit more updated or whatever. And, and also because of the fact that it’s comedy, it doesn’t have to follow the exact meter. In fact, sometimes it’s funnier if it doesn’t, and it doesn’t rhyme. It catches people by surprise. So yeah, you can be a little loose that way, you know?

matt nappo 9:23
Yeah. Christopher doesn’t naturally Yeah, there you go. Yeah, yeah, some of those some of this stuff is really the melody though. Makes me think that at some level there there is a composer in you that wants or needs I should say, a classic rock hit song because, again, I’m not to blow smoke up your ass. But I think melody writing and the melodies you pick out are very unique, very radio friendly, at least for my generation. My job. That’s

Henry Phillips 9:59
that’s really cool to hear that you’re absolutely right. I’ve always tried really hard that the song that you just referenced to that turned out to be the duet that I do with my friend Julia lillas which is a completely ridiculous song with all kinds of sex references and stuff but the melody on that one, I was listening to a lot of that Brian Wilson stuff right after Good Vibrations, you know, when he started taking his downfall and started running some of the most beautiful melodies, like Surf’s up and a bunch of other ones and, and I was influenced by that and i and i actually that that melody was part of a song that I was writing for a friend of mine who’s whose mom had just died. And I I didn’t have a career. I didn’t have a career as a songwriter I couldn’t there’s it really honestly would have fallen completely on deaf ears for me to finish that song as nice as it might have been. But I wasn’t a recording artist, if nobody would have ever heard it. But I did have this comedy thing going so I when Julia and I came up with the idea for that duet, I started going back to other melodies and going oh, I never used this one for anything. But if that just for people that are interested on YouTube, you just put duet with Henry Phillips and Julia lillas. And it’s in it’s in you it’s on YouTube. And it’s the the melody is a very sincere and I’m actually very proud of it, but no, but I appreciate that you notice it because a lot of people don’t even think about it. They just hear the jokes. But yeah,

matt nappo 11:37
a lot of them a lot of you songs, you have great melodies. And again, I’m really impressed by your voice when you’re doing and I’ve seen some clips where you weren’t necessarily trying to be funny, but you were just singing from the heart and noticing your voice technique and it’s like wow, well you got to really, again not blowing smoke up your eyes. This is a genuine sincere compliment. Really a really good voice for pop rock. You know folk music, all that kind of stuff. What, cuz I have to ask what you’re and it’s a cliche that I hate asking any musician but your influences seem to be all over the place. And I will say that because I’ve never seen anybody go from F 13 chord into a B major ever in my life until I saw you do it. I’m like, wow, that’s some heavy jazz influence, right? Oh yeah. Why would you listen to where’d you get that stuff on? Yeah,

Henry Phillips 12:34
13th is great. Okay, so I used to be partnered up with a buddy of mine who would sing and I’d play guitar and we’d be on the patio at restaurants and we’d make like 100 bucks each and we would go through the whole catalogue of you know we would do Eagles songs and you know Billy Joe or whatever, but it was guitar and vocal but every time every now and then he would throw a song at me that he wanted to do but it wasn’t a guitar song like like a perfect example is just the way you are but Billy Joel and I was looking at the course and I was already a semi accomplished guitar player at this point. This is this is in the 90s and I looked at the chords I was like these are not Guitar Chords you know it was like the first one is de that’s fine and then it’s B minor six and then it’s G major seventh go into a G minor six we’ve added 13 I think and or added nine or something but I was just like whoa let’s happen in here but but I went ahead and took the challenge and I was like and I want to tell any any guitar players out there, take that particular piece of music and learn those chords and it’ll really expand your vocabulary, your chord vocabulary and and other ones to bridge over troubled water. If you watch Paul’s Paul Simon who is a guitar player, his chords are fantastic. I mean really, really good. Especially like his solo stuff. I was really inspired by the movie one trick pony. When we made our punch in the clown movie which the director of our movie Greg v ns turned me on to that movie and I was like wow, but But yeah, so his songwriting so I love when, when songs are on the guitar, but they do piano chords. So those are a couple of influences. Still on the pop genre, but also Tom Waits I’m big on who’s always of course a big piano player. He has he has a song called invitation of the blues that I learned that one on the guitar and that’s got some beautiful chords in it. And yeah, just all those singer songwriter guys, but I love a good good top three chord guitar song, but I also like when they start getting a little more experimental with the court. You know what another good one is you just got me on something that I’d love to talk about too, by the way, but the song by the beegees How deep is your love? Oh

matt nappo 15:02
yeah, great song on Guitar Man. Boy, yeah,

Henry Phillips 15:06
that was one that we did too. And I was just like, Whoa, I think the whole thing is like in key of E flat. But it’s all, you know, going from the minor to the major. And yeah, that’s a great one too.

matt nappo 15:19
I took that song apart years ago for a kind of like workshop to kind of say, how do you write this song? Because you don’t start out with those chords and try to put a melody to it? I think you’d be and I don’t know this for a fact. But I think the beegees kind of start out with singing the song and then figure out what are the chords that will make that really, that melody really jump out. But that that song in particular got me going like, wow, how do you how do you write a song?

Henry Phillips 15:48
I know. Yeah, I know, I think it’s the way that you just said, yeah, that’s the way that I’ve always done it. Like, the melody kind of comes first. And then you try to figure out which chords fit and you try to be as, as interesting as you can, without messing up the integrity of it, you know, but, uh, yeah, and then, but with me, it was an extra step, because I would think of a funny stand up idea. You know, I’d be like, Okay, well, what about a song about a, you know, a, you know, all the people that have, you know, made contributions to Western civilization, you know, you know, Da Vinci and you know, all of the Western philosophers and all these people. What about a song that talks about how great they were, but also what freaks that they were, because they all had these weird sexual fetishes and all that stuff. So then that’s like the stand up kind of idea, the comedy idea, and then it turned into Alright, so what’s the melody that I’m going to use and then I would just file through all these ideas that I had for melodies that I probably written just completely in earnest, that were supposed to be regular songs. And then I’d pick one and then I would just so so that way, at least the music still has a chance like if you didn’t speak English, and you heard it, you’d probably just think this is a regular folk song or something, you know, and that and that’s my favorite kind, you know, where you can’t tell because nobody’s really putting on a funny voice or making a funny music. You’re just just taking the idea and putting against a song that sounds legit.

matt nappo 17:26
Sometimes it’s sincerity with which you deliver it makes it all that more funny. Like he’s saying something that’s ridiculous. But you, you have this very serious and sincere tone in your voice and look on your face. Like you’re delivering a rock anthem, but you’re saying something like, crafting a great, you know, format, which is standing on the shoulders of the freaks. The song you just mentioned, it’s hard to explain. You know, when you go to see a comic, you can come back and say, Man, I saw this great comic last night, and he told some jokes. And here’s basically some of them. Yours. I mean, if I go to explain standing on the shoulders of freaks to my wife, she just looked at me like, what the hell? What the hell are you talking about? That’s funny. Well, I got to see him do it. Yeah.

Henry Phillips 18:17
Yeah, it’s not really a very easily repeatable thing. Yeah. But um, well, you know, I think one of the things that I was inspired by Well, a lot of the stuff that was going on on SNL when I was a kid was just mind blowingly funny, mostly those sketches that would happen in the last half hour that I don’t even think you can find them online anymore. It’s weird, but But remember, you obviously remember deep thoughts, you know, on SNL. So that was that kind of thing, right? Where he was saying it in that really, you know, small t sort of a poetic kind of a way, you know, touchy feely sort of new agey and they had the music and the presentation and everything and then all the more reason for the punchline of the jokes to just kind of blindside you you know, and it’s that presentation that I really liked a lot, right?

matt nappo 19:08
A couple of things they just want to ask you for my personal understanding of value because I’m a I’m a huge fan but I need to and this is for me, not for the audience. A couple of things I noticed is that this the old son pick, I know Yeah, play with that but you’re not doing what I call Travis picking it you’re using it in a very rock and roll kind of wait. Okay.

Henry Phillips 19:33
Wait should correct me so Travis is the one where you’re doing it like this? Is that right? Or

matt nappo 19:37
you’re doing the alternate baselines and doing and you’re locking your hand and be able to play the melody and the baseline at the same time time? Yeah, time your manual those drums, bass and get the end there. Oh, wow. Yeah, yeah.

Henry Phillips 19:49
No, I, you know, I, what I do is I’ll do I’ll use my thumb. Okay, if it’s a G chord, for example, We’ll just a standard G I’ll do a thumb to hit that lowest note and then with these three fingers I’ll just grab the the other, you know, three of those chords or strings whichever ones that they are. And so it’s more of a you know, your own it’s a little like a drummer, you know, bass snare bass boom, didn’t you know, something like that. But I’m also singing at the same time, but I will say that I was doing that naturally anyway. And then I had a one of the first guys that I met when I was doing like coffee houses and stuff was a guy named Marty Canada who ended up being my manager. And probably the main thing that he did was increased my musicality because he was a guitar player and, and the first thing he told me to do is you got to use that thumb pick because when I was on stage, the bass notes were getting lost, right? And, and because there’s just obviously the way the guitar is, it’s your, your thumb would have to be working extra hard in order, but you know, so I started using that thumping, and everything sounded much more balanced. And that was great. But um, but yeah, I don’t, I don’t really I just tried to make sure that all the notes of the quarter in there, but I’m not, I’m not necessarily doing anything fancy that way. But I will say that I did some classical training too. So when I’m just doing solo guitar, like the probably the most difficult one I ever learned was the entertainer for the guitar, which was really difficult. I found some sheet music for it some somewhere but but yeah, I’ve only dabbled in that never really mastered

matt nappo 21:36
Chet, Chet Atkins swing doing the entertainer and he’s using his own picking. Oh, yeah. I’ve heard that traditional Travis picking and now Yeah, yeah, that’s unbelievable. That’s just good. And you know, I thank you for the audience for indulging me on that, because I’m just curious. Where some pics come in. A lot of people just adopt them naturally. For me, I think you’re right, though. bass notes. If you’re just using your thumb, and I’m, you know, especially if I’m playing electric. I’ll never use a thumb pick. Oh, yeah. playing acoustic bass notes just don’t come through if you’re just using the right go. Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, we kind of we mentioned the films and kind of a casual conversation away. For people who don’t know punching the clown was the first movie, it was highly acclaimed. And then there was a follow up just a few years ago, I think, like five years ago now punching Henry. I see them all in one movie. But so in order in order to condense that whole long singer songwriter troubadour extraordinare, how about we just call you a storyteller? Because I think that’s what you are. And now I’m curious about your relationship with the director, I think, from if I have it correctly, you know him from undergraduate years in college, and you’ve kept a relationship all the time, and now putting films together?

Henry Phillips 23:00
Yeah, absolutely. The so so he and I met in college, I had pretty much given up on any dream of being a rock star. And I was out here in LA, which is basically my hometown, I spent some time in New Jersey, and which I think is one of the reasons our mutual friend, Tom Konopka and I, you know, got along really well, but so I, after jersey, we moved out to LA. And I went to UCLA, and I went through this whole like community college system, and eventually got to UCLA. And my one friend that I have is this guy that I’d sit next to all the time, we were political science majors. And we just chatted a lot. He was from France. I thought that was interesting. He thought it was fascinating that I was in the music and so we’d sort of share you know, stories about that. And then and then when we graduated, he went to film school because that was his dream is to become a filmmaker. And I’ve started going full on into the stand up comedy thing, just kind of backed into it. By my last year of college, I started doing these open mic nights, and having a lot of fun with it. It was sort of a hobby, and but I would tell Greg is my friend there and I would, we still kept up and I would tell him these stories, you know, I’d just be like, Oh, man, I played at this bar last night where the guy says that he’s gonna give me $4 for every person. And he gives me $14 at the end of the thing, and we had like, 40 people there, but I know he’s ripping me off, but I mean, at least rip me off with a number that makes sense. Like if he said 12, then that’d be like, Alright, well, according to his books, he counted three people, but 14 isn’t even divisible by four. So I don’t know how he could get, you know, so I would tell him stuff like this. And he was like, man, we got it. We got to make a movie of this. I don’t know how we’re going to do it. But that’s so his final project at UCLA I’m sorry at Syracuse University is where he went after graduate school or undergrad. He, he made a little short film that was made there was basically a precursor to our punching the clown movies and that available to see and yeah, there’s some of it on YouTube if you if you put punching the clown portrait because it was called a portrait of Henry Phillips, you can see little bits of it, it’s on there somewhere not the whole thing, but we might eventually put it on there.

matt nappo 25:25
I’m sorry to interrupt you.

Henry Phillips 25:28
That’s all right. But anyway, so that that started our whole thing. And then ever since then we, we became writing partners. And we would just, you know, do outlines for feature film and dream of making a feature film that tied all these stories together. And then we started seeing things pop up, like Curb Your Enthusiasm, which was really similar to what we were kind of going for and the stuff that Ricky Jabez was doing. And so I think in 2007, we finally, technology got to a point where you could rent a camera that looked almost like film and, and Greg just showed up to my door one time, and he just he said, Man, let’s just make this movie, I don’t know, I’ll borrow money from family, I’ll use whatever my life savings is, but we’re just going to, because he’s like, I’ve got films, he became a film professor. And he’s like, I’ve got film students that can help us. And they’re making films by themselves. And I’m teaching it and it’s like, I never wanted to be a teacher, I wanted to be a filmmaker. So you know, let’s do this. And I was like, well, let’s do it. So we wrote out an outline and, and just eventually had a couple of false starts, but eventually landed a kid who was one of his film students to produce it. Meaning, you know, to make up all the calls to the, you know, the locations get sag on board, you know, and all the crew get the crew together. I mean, there’s a lot of work there that neither Gregor are interested in doing. And, and eventually, in 2008, the first couple months, to date, probably just about the most exciting. Three or four weeks of my life was the beginning of 2008 when we were actually making that film that we had been talking about for 12 years, or whatever it was, and it was fantastic. And and, and then a year later, we were done with the movie and showed it at a Theater in New York called quad cinemas and and then it got on Netflix. And before he knew it, it was I was literally like walking around the streets of New York and San Francisco and Houston, Texas. And every now and then not all the time. But sometimes somebody be like, Hey, I think I just saw a movie of yours on Netflix. And I was like, Wow, that’s so cool. Because it was on during that time where everybody started doing the streaming thing. So they didn’t have a ton of stuff. And people just kind of run would run out of stuff to watch and they just start browsing. Okay, punching the clown. Let’s see what this is all about. And so yeah, that’s that’s the story of that. And Greg and I still work together to this day. I mean, I just yesterday, we talked for a couple hours about a new screenplay that we’re trying to put together.

matt nappo 28:15
Oh, Tao, please tell me it’s a third. Henry. So sort

Henry Phillips 28:19
of, it’s a well, the idea was always that I, mice, all of my stories are still from that era when I started, which was the early 90s. So they’re just all they don’t really work in today’s world because of social media and cell phones. And there’s so many plots that you couldn’t really have any more so we thought, maybe it’s time to do a period piece. So it’d be like a prequel, like the early 90s. But you

matt nappo 28:46
can’t play yourself as a kid. I mean, you look young, but

Henry Phillips 28:51
yeah, be a kid has had some rough years. So yeah, so we’re changing a lot of who the main character is and whose perspective it’ll be from and everything like that, but but the stories were always to me the most important part of it, and those will all be in there because we we left a lot of stories untold from that era.

matt nappo 29:12
You know, I have to mention this. I don’t know if anybody has ever said this to you before, but you have a resemblance to a young or middle age now. Robert Redford, you could do okay. I think you could probably pull up the rug.

Henry Phillips 29:31
Yeah, maybe I can have him. Well, that’s,

matt nappo 29:35
that’s your movie. So I love them. And again, this is no smoke. I would rate them right up there with the top films and again, I look at them as one film now. It’s like the Godfather saga. banri Saga, but um, there’s a line in there, but you broke my heart. You really and I think it’s in punching Henry. Yeah, it is. Funny, I set you online. Your reaction to it got me but the line from funny guitar boy says I wouldn’t want to be. I wouldn’t want to be playing these rooms in my 40s and you just gave that like sigh and at that moment I said, imagine playing those rooms in the 60s because that’s my life. Oh yeah. Should I kill myself now? Or wait till the end of the movie? Tell me

Henry Phillips 30:25
behind you. I mean, at this point, I’m in my 50s so I’m not far

matt nappo 30:29
but you’re playing those types of rooms? Oh, yeah.

Henry Phillips 30:33
Well, I don’t know I’ve got the loony bin coming up in Wichita, Kansas next, a week and a half from now. Now I’m certainly not doing like you know, all glitzy theaters and stuff every now and then I’ll get I’ll get a gig that’s got a little more glamorous, but it’s like the smaller the town The better the? The treatment, I guess. Because Yeah, if I went to New York, I would be. Yeah, I’d be in a basically a shoe box.

matt nappo 31:00
To convince myself that, wait a minute, he’s right about fat, you know, funny, you’re tall boys, that I want to be nice to my 40s. But as I got into my 40s, that’s when I started enjoying playing those rooms. And if I look at it, honestly, right now, I wouldn’t. I wouldn’t trade what the rooms I play in, which are those kinds of rooms and sometimes bigger rooms. But I wouldn’t trade that for the theater experience. I liked the intimacy, I liked getting to know the crowd. As long as they’re not too drunk and rowdy after I like getting to know the people that are coming to see me. Do you agree with that and feel like,

Henry Phillips 31:34
I do agree. And I want to make sure I’m not doing this laughable thing that I saw you to do. Like when their popularity started going down. I saw an article that it looked like they were trying to spin it and they’re saying, We’re gonna start going into more intimate venues now because we feel like we miss and it’s like, Oh, come on, you’re just not getting the crowds that he is. It’s a voluntary thing. It’s like, you know, we just sort of we’ve done that the arena thing. Now we wanted to go to the smaller venue. But so I’m not trying to say that it wouldn’t be great to just show up to some place and have 3000 people and then you’re on to the next town. That would be great. But, but you are absolutely right. And I think that most comedians that I know, I’d be really surprised if they didn’t agree, you know that they all started in comedy clubs. And comedy clubs are a lot of fun, you’re in the back of the room hanging out with the waitstaff. They’re all your friends for the week, and then, you know, 30 feet away from you, your buddies up on stage and says, There is bring up, you know, whoever it is, and then you go up. And you can see everybody’s faces, you can see them when they’re laughing. If they’re not laughing, you can work on that you can say, all right, well, what’s going on here? Well, you know, a theater you just see lights or just nothing. And that’s, that’s a lot more cold, you know, and But no, I love being in, in rooms, you know, clubs. Yeah. And I feel like the sensibilities better to there’s a I don’t know, well, I mean, I tried to do colleges for a little bit. And that was always really difficult in terms of the venue, it was either in the cafeteria, or even, like, if it’s in an auditorium or something, it’s just too wide and echoey, and the sound got lost or whatever. And, and I was, and I don’t think that the college students were grown up enough to start having a dark sense of humor, you know, and so I was like, most comfortable when I was like, between 30 and 40. And at a comedy club, and you could email everybody’s having a few drinks, maybe a couple people or divorced people started getting that kind of jaded. Sort of a little bit darker sense of humor, and I like that, you know, I would think it at theatres, I’m sure it’s great, but you don’t really have any, any gauge of what the personality of the audience is, you know, just some, some couple that’s never even been to a comedy show. But they figured that something that they saw on the newspaper that they’re going to be doing tonight, you know, but yeah, I really, really do like the comedy clubs,

matt nappo 34:12
especially doing the kind of work that you do. Sometimes the laughs aren’t, aren’t always like, especially in the beginning, like belly laughs they’re small laughs And if somebody is 1000 feet away, that small laugh isn’t gonna make it to the stage and you’re not getting any of that energy that you need. Oh, I

Henry Phillips 34:29
know. That’s very true. Now I kind of rely on having everybody pretty close together so that if one person laughs It sounds like they’re all kind of with me, you know? Yeah, there’s a some expression that I’ll probably butcher but it’s something like you know, if you have 10% of the audience that’s on your side, they can turn a whole show and your favorite you know, and it’s a lot harder to reach that 10% if you’ve got several 1000 people, but you know, in a room with 100 people in 10 people sure Yeah And yeah, no and and there’s some great comedy clubs around this country too.

matt nappo 35:06
Yeah. Another thing you allude to in the first film, I think it was Yeah, what’s the first film? I think you’re in a recording studio and this kind of struck me it’s a lot of your songs take a lot of bravery because you bravery might be the wrong word. I mean, nobody’s gonna kill you. But you’re taking your time to get to the funny part like a lot, especially with music stuff. And I know this for a fact when people want to, they want that laugh upfront and sometimes it takes a minute of listening to you sing to you get to the part that gets the first laugh. Yes, well, that takes some bravery and take some conditioning to get your get yourself able to deal with that and stay maintain your composure and say I know the laugh is coming to confidence and I know that they’re gonna get this eventually but I have to set them up properly. That that’s professional and it takes some getting used to tell tell me about how you got to that point because I would be nervous starting out that oh my god, I’m a minute into this. I haven’t gotten a laugh yet. I better get that pretty quick. get thrown out. There gonna flash the light. If we get off today. It’s whatever. How did you acquire patience and confidence?

Henry Phillips 36:18
Yeah, what you’re describing was the hardest part about what I what I did. And I so in the beginning, it was copy houses where people were expecting a real song. So it was like a minute and a half of this song. Everybody’s going okay. Alright, so he’s he’s upset about a breakup or whatever’s going on. And then all of a sudden, the lyrics would take a little bit of a turn, but still completely straight faced. And they’re like, Okay, well, now he’s talking about calling the police and, you know, and now this is starting to get out of hand and, and he’s losing control of his bodily functions in the middle of the living room, and just like, what the hell is this? And then and then and then everybody went, Oh, okay. It’s a joke. All right, I’m on board. And then they get on the mailing list and you develop a little bit of a following. But then I started doing comedy clubs in like 99 that was about about six years into trying to build this act that was based on exactly what you’re talking about that kind of Sucker Punch thing. And I’m telling you there were some rough ones, there were some really rough ones. And when I was the opening act, it was okay because there’s not as much pressure and and they would sort of go along with me. And then when they found out it was a joke, they’d be like, Oh, this is great. But then I started getting booked as the headliner because those middle middle act shows went really well. And that’s when I had some really really difficult ones I’d be I remember a string of them that I did up in Michigan was like in Grand Rapids Michigan and then clearly it should have been called the Henry Phillips sucks from one town to another tour because ever they’ve just we’re not getting it and the club owner in every case was standing in the back just go on I don’t think this is funny and then by the time I started getting to the funny parts, they had already checked out right? And that’s the fear so yeah, so I had a difficult time after several years of having this problem. I started I pretty much coward you know, chickened out. But but but in a way that I that I liked, I started because I at this point, I had a lot of jokes in between my songs that I would do some banner. And so I thought, Well, why don’t I just do all those at the top without the guitar? And so I started just doing stand up comedy. So if you were to get at the loony bin, or the funny bone, you went to see stand up comedy. So from the middle act, going into the headliner, okay, we’re still in that genre. Now the guy’s standing there, and he’s doing jokes. So I would do that. And I’d say, Hey, does anybody want to hear music? And then they already knew I’m joking, right? So it was a much much easier situation but it took me years and also, I can’t tell you how much envy I had when I watched people like the Flight of the Conchords or Tenacious D or these guys that were really doing that that serious songwriting thing but they weren’t they didn’t have to do it at the funny bone they were just they were sort of famous already. So they they were able to do that kind of thing that I was always you know, wishing that I could do but I couldn’t if I ever wanted to work at the comedy club again. It’s It’s ironic like you kind of have to be well known when you get messed around like that. Yeah, exactly. But but but I’m happy now I go up and I do. I do probably 15 minutes of stand up and I do you know, a lot of topical stuff and, and then I’ll just jump right into the songs and I’m kind of liking the groove that it’s got now.

matt nappo 39:49
Even your stand up has that kind of sincerity within the delivery of a bed. That makes it very It’s a different kind of stand up than anybody else does. So, you know, I know I’m blowing a lot of smoke at you, buddy. stuff. Now again, I love the films but like with historical fiction and novels, I’m a sucker for wanting to know what’s real and what’s not real because obviously these films are semi autobiographical. Yeah, I want to know what’s real and what’s not. And what what I take away from being a musician for 45 years now I’m performing. I’ve never been heckled. I’ve tried stand up and didn’t even get heckled doing stand up I shot, but I didn’t get heckled. I don’t know what that experience is like. But since you broach the subject, I think three times in both in both movies combined, this idea of getting heckling, I have, I have to think that at some point, it’s in your psyche, just that the whole you know, being hurt or wounded by some of these assholes can show up and they don’t do it for acting. They don’t do it for music. comedy is the only place you’ll see assholes show up and want to ruin your show. Is any of that stuff that’s in the movie based on reality? And is there a woman?

Henry Phillips 41:13
Yeah, Oh, absolutely. No, because I’m a I’m an incredibly self conscious person. It’s a lot of people are just like the worst nightmare that they could ever imagine as being heckled as a comedian. It’s like I I’m an idiot who picked that to be a possibility in my career. It’s like, I can’t believe that I wound up in that situation. But yeah, absolutely. Oh man, I’ve had some terrible terrible ones. In the movie, we depicted a couple of them. You know, one of the in the first movie, we had one where there was just a miss booking, you know, I was supposed to be performing my comedy and then they said, Oh, yeah, we also booked and it’s always some event, you know, it’s like, we also booked I think in real life, there was one that was like, it was all a, you know, cancer survivors or something like that. And it’s like, not not that they couldn’t have a sense of humor, but they were a pretty serious bunch and, and dark humor was not going over? Well, I mean, dark humor is really one of those kind of things that you you’re sort of privileged to be able to, to make those types of jokes, and then you don’t really think about him too much. But I yeah, I felt really uncomfortable one time doing a show like that. And I was just like, what? When do I get to that point where everybody’s there? Because they want to see what I’m doing? Because I was there. But um, yeah, no, I also had one. I remember having one in MLA of all places where it was a sports bar, and the guy ran the bar was British. And he didn’t really know much about American sports, but he definitely wanted to sell beers. And he did a whole promotion where he bust all these kids from USC to come in and watch their team basically clinch the season. And, and then he didn’t want any space between the end of the game and then me going on right after that to perform and he was just, you know, serving them tons and tons of drinks the whole time. So they were pretty drunk. And the guy lines up overcompensating, and so the game’s not even over yet. And he goes, Okay, go go go on there. And I go, Well, I don’t think the game’s over yet. He goes, it’s alright. They already know who won’t just get up up there. Like he had some kind of OCD about, like, God forbid, there’s a couple minutes in between the game and you know, right. Yeah, and they couldn’t, because they were all bused in there anyway, and it was like it didn’t even give them a chance to go to the bathroom or go up and get another beer or whatever. So then I went up there and going back to what you were saying, I’m doing this, this kind of Sucker Punch thing. So all of a sudden, they went from watching their game and they’re drunk to now they got a folk singer on stage, just singing for a minute and a half of a song that sounded like it was at that time I was opening with this song sounded like a religious like a campfire, religious song, and about God’s creatures or whatever and, and they’re just like, what is going on here. And literally, people started throwing things at the stage. There was a band that was going to play later. So the drum set was set up and one guy threw a chair and it crashed into the drum set. And then that was then the band that was there started jumping in and the guy who was doing the sound became sort of a bouncer. And he started and it was just absolute chaos. So yeah, and so and then I got I got off the stage because I was afraid somebody was gonna throw something at me. Or kick my ass or whatever and, and then the guy didn’t even pay me the 100 bucks that I was supposed to get. Because I didn’t do the set and I’m like, what you gave me an impossible situation here and

matt nappo 44:51
they have no sympathy for their mistakes. Oh, yeah,

Henry Phillips 44:54
it was awful. Yeah. But yeah, no, but in the movie, I would say overall Everything is at least based on a true story except in the you have to have an over reaching a plot, right? And so so in the second one, when you watch and the first movie, when you watch it from scene to scene, I can tell you the parallel real life story for just about everything in that movie. Except there’s this sort of telephone game thing where I say something off the cuff and eventually go That’s racist thing. Yeah, well, I’ll tell you the true part of it. I went to a meeting with a manager out here in LA. And it wasn’t bagels, it was donuts. He had a bunch of doughnuts. And he’s like, he’s a real powerful guy. And he’s like, and refill up. So would you like one of these donuts? And I was like, Okay, I’m just eating a doughnut. And there’s kind of a low in the conversation. And eventually, I was like, these are good doughnuts. And he’s like, yeah, they are good, aren’t they? And I was like, yeah, so where are they from? And he’s like, I don’t know. And then he gets, you know, on the speakerphone or whatever. And he’s like, Hi, Lisa. Can we find out where we got the doughnuts? Henry Phillips is here and he’s he’s a you know, an up and coming new comedian. He wants to know, and then, of course, the Secretary was like, I don’t know where we got the frickin doughnuts, but she’s trying to figure it out. And then she calls back and she’s like, hey, Dave got the doughnuts. And he’s I can’t get on the phone with him. Right now. He’s on a run, I guess be in just like before everybody was all hooked up with their cell phones and stuff. And so then he gets on the phone. He picks it up and he goes, Henry, I’m sorry. And he’s like, why is this a problem? Why is this a problem? I asked you where the doughnuts are? It’s the easiest question in the world. You can’t tell me I’ve got Henry Phillips here. I’m trying to you know i mean he he’s I don’t know what he said he is up and coming comic. You know, he’s, he want the guy wants to know where the doughnuts are? Find out. He hangs up and I’m just sitting here going, Oh, this is mortifying, you know, yeah. To hear

matt nappo 47:07
and the girl thinks you’re a dick. No, absolutely.

Henry Phillips 47:11
She thinks that I’m some asshole. Like, I’m a 28 year old guy. And I’m just some guy going, I want to know where the damn doughnuts are. So anyway, so that was the end of the real story. And then and then we started thinking, Well, what could have How funny would it be if if it turned into some kind of telephone game thing? You know, we made it bagels, because that way it’s like, oh, maybe he’s being anti semitic or something like that. And, and, and that was the big thing at that time, right? Like when it Cramer from Seinfeld is on on his show. And he went viral for his rant and then,

matt nappo 47:49
but he actually said so.

Henry Phillips 47:52
But the thing is, how funny would it be if there was a guy who got blamed for all that stuff, but never even did anything like that? I mean, that’s the worst punishment Yeah, that you could get so. So that’s pretty much where that that idea came from.

matt nappo 48:05
I live that there was a period of time back 2020 years ago. So we were playing at a very popular spot all the time. And there was a bouncer in a club who happened to be black. And White was getting into some altercation with some regulars who happened to be white. And a lot of white people started to gang up on the guy and I went to defend him. Now it was a hells Angel guy who started throwing the N word around a lot. And they chased this guy into the back alley to kill him. And I went back to protect them. And somehow it got around that I was one of the guys chasing him. I was one of the guys yelling the N word. And I had to kind of leave the band for a couple of years and leave that town basically known as the racist guy took a couple of years of me to kind of clear up my reputations in I was there to protect

Henry Phillips 49:01
no good deed. Yeah, so

matt nappo 49:03
I relate to a watch your movies. Oh, yeah. Oh, man. Oh, wait. Oh, yeah. It’s like the story of my life.

Henry Phillips 49:12
Yeah, well, it’s funny that you bring that up, too. Because remember, I mentioned that guy, Marty categor, who is my first manager, the guy taught me about the thumb pics. He was telling me, we were talking about the movie Spinal Tap, which I could not get enough of, I must have seen it. 50 times I had the whole thing memorized and everything like that. And he loved it too, because he loves humor. But he was telling me he goes a lot of guys. I guess. He was probably about 20 years older than I am. And he said a lot of the guys that I knew didn’t like the movie. Because they didn’t think think it was funny at all. They just thought, Man this is bringing up bad memories. I remember when we had the show, you know we had the record company. The record store signing and nobody showed up and everybody’s yelling at each other. I mean, these were all real stories that were hilarious to me, but a lot of people live through them. And, and I and I’ve had a little bit of that with, with my movies, too, because I, I’ve had people say that they’re depressing. Yeah. And it’s like, real life,

matt nappo 50:23
don’t do one or two lines that you kind of take. Wow, well, yeah, that that’s a real moment. But all comedy I think has to have that, that. It has to be comfortable. At some point, that little bit of uncomfortableness will make the punch line all that more funny when you get to that point. And it’s it’s an important thing to kind of take that uncomfortable moment in and really absorb it and say, what does it mean to me?

Henry Phillips 50:51
I agree. There’s the movie, the movie King of Comedy is a good example. Have you seen that and a lot of people wouldn’t even classify it as a comedy to me, I’m laughing my ass off. But I’m like, there’s one part of that movie where every time it used to be on on TV, I had to change the channel. Like I couldn’t be in the room while that scene is going on when. When he invites when he invites a date over to Jerry lewis’s house. And Jerry loses coming they have that dramatic irony of his show. And I’m like, this is just too much man. I gotta change the channel. It’s like it’s so incredibly uncomfortable, but at the same time, it’s so awesome that it makes you feel that way.

matt nappo 51:34
douche chills. That’s what I call it. Exactly. Yeah. Um, so yeah, the movies are great. And we got some comments in the in the chat room about the Densmore incident. I just discovered that in the last week.

Henry Phillips 51:50
Oh, the Densmore house in Kansas. Yeah,

matt nappo 51:54
I didn’t I didn’t even know that that video existed and then I found that the battle a week ago, and I’m trying to explain it to my wife, I of course, I do a very poor, but that that had me actually, like, laughing out loud at a computer screen, which doesn’t happen too often. Was that a real incident? Was that bass? Yes,

Henry Phillips 52:15
that was absolutely real. I mean, I played it up a little bit with the music and tried to make it like like one of those drama things, you know, but uh, but yeah, no, that absolutely I was born out of my mind driving all the way back to LA from I think it was Iowa and just Kansas, I think is about six hours from one side of the state to the other. And just you’re hoping a tornado is going to happen just so that you can see something. And I kept on seeing a sign saying, you know, Densmore house, you know, check this out. And so I just thought, well, I’ll do anything at this point, I had to go to the bathroom anyway. And so I went, and there’s this house that was built by a civil war veteran, and they were doing tours, and they had a lot of old people getting off the buses and to take this tour. And I was like, What the hell, you know, I’ll take the tour, and I paid like the 10 bucks or whatever. And I go in, and it’s pretty amazing. There’s a house where everybody, everybody was marveling at the fact that the guy built this thing by hand, and there’s a lot of incredible design stuff. And there’s engineers that couldn’t replicate the things that he did with his house, you know, typical museum type stuff. But at one point, somebody started noticing that it smelled like dogshit. And, and I smelled it too. And I’m just like, what is this and we’re like, up in one of the bedrooms or something like that. And the tour guide is like, yeah, I smell that does you guys, do you want to check your shoes or whatever, and I pick up one of my shoes, and it’s just completely just matted down with dogshit. Yeah, and I looked everywhere. And I had been tracking footsteps of dogshit throughout this whole house. And all these old people are like, ah, Tim grows, what are you doing? And I felt like such an asshole. You know, I just felt like such an outcast. And they were like, okay, let’s all go out in the backyard. Do sir if you don’t mind taking your shoes off or whatever. And so but and that’s another one where the story basically ended there. But of course, my mind is thinking Am I gonna have to pay some kind of cleaning costs? And how much is that going to cost? You know, I don’t know what kind of wood that they’re using. You know, I mean, they’re taking all these precautions to preserve everything and But yeah, I pretty much ended there. But But yeah, so the whole the whole video is, yeah, it’s on there. It’s

matt nappo 54:46
the question and bear with danger. The question it begs is has any of the people who were there taking the tour that day, seen that video and contacted you and saying, oh, you’re the head? Oh, yeah, no,

Henry Phillips 54:58
it happened. I’m guessing about maybe 10 years ago or even more. And

matt nappo 55:06
the internet being what it is, though somebody who is going to see it eventually

Henry Phillips 55:11
I kind of I kind of hope so. I mean, I would think it would come come up when people search YouTube for the Densmore house because other stuff, but no, I’ve never had anybody that noticed it, but I, hey, maybe I can help, you know, bring bring people to help make the place famous or something. That would be

matt nappo 55:32
beautiful. Check that out tonight, I think and I’m gonna encourage the audience playing search terms within Morehouse and Henry Phillips to kind of push that up in this surgery. Yeah.

Henry Phillips 55:45
algorithm. Yeah. But yeah, on YouTube, it’s called brush with danger. If anybody wants to look it up and right. It was gonna be I was gonna make it a series or something. But we never really did that.

matt nappo 55:56
I loved the treatment that you gave that because it does start and I thought, wow, is he part of one of these? You know, television shows that real life incidents and then to figure out it was a gag, but I love that treatment of it. Because it’s it’s so and you went very far out of your way to get all the lighting right in the hallway. Oh, yeah. the look and feel of that testimonial piece?

Henry Phillips 56:19
Yeah, well, I did that through. There’s a production company called all things comedy, which is run by a bunch of comics that they set up. The cinematographer did a great job. I don’t remember his name, but I’m sure it’s on there. But yeah, it was it was pretty fun.

matt nappo 56:33
Now, we are coming up on time, and I want to be respectful of your time. I’m grateful to have you here. And thank you to Tom Konopka for making this happen. Yeah, but I also want to talk quickly about the highway man and Henry’s kitchen if we can squeeze both of those in now. The highway man, funny stuff, very influenced by, I guess, late 70s 80s. network television shows, I guess, the most recent episode, I think, is the one I have in my way. Brendon Walsh is Yeah, photos and get the tattoo. Yeah, so there’s, yeah, tell me about the heart. There’s

Henry Phillips 57:12
there’s two there’s the ones that I put up on YouTube, which I’ll take some time and sort of tweak them and everything and just put them out randomly and those are publicly released. And you can see those on YouTube. Just to let people know that they’re on if you put Henry Phillips YouTube you’ll see all the stuff that we’re talking about here but um, so the highway man Yeah, there was a whole bunch of shows that was like Kung Fu, the Hulk you know, $6 million man Highway to Heaven. All these shows were just involved a drifter, you know? And so I thought, well, I want to be one of those guys, you know, but I want to be the 50 year old guy who’s like mysterious who just drifts from one town to another but my I don’t have a special talent. I’m not good at anything. In fact, I, I wind up making things worse in the town before I move to the next one, you know, and so it’s called the highway man. And, yeah, I’m just a guy and I’ve got a wig. And I’ve got like a jean jacket. And I’ll see mostly people stranded on the highway, and I’ll try to help them with their car, but it winds up being worse than it was before I got there. But yeah, the Brendan Brendan Walsh is great. And I’m working with a lot of my comic buddies on it, which is great. So yeah, there’s an episode where my buddy Brandon Walsh is in the like, at a high highway turn off, and he’s taking pictures with this camera. And then I’m witnessing a thug named a comic named Steve Gillespie, who’s just a guy who is, you know, mugger basically and he shows up to steal the camera and they wrestle with it. And eventually Steve gets branded on the ground starts kicking his ass and highway man is just sitting there in the bushes, watching the whole thing. And even writing down trying to make a drawing of the thing is if that’s going to help anything, and so once the coast is clear, and Steve takes off with Brendan’s camera, and then Brennan’s dusted himself off that’s when highway man comes out of the bushes and says Hey, man, I got I got the police sketch of the guy you know, you can give this to the police maybe they’ll be able to find it and Brennan’s like Who the hell’s this guy? So yeah, those are all on YouTube and, and, and Henry’s kitchen also. So about 10 years ago, I made a kitchen video out of my bachelor apartment, I was going through a breakup so it came off extra depressing. And I wrote music for it that was over the top depressing and and the second one that I did was called Henry’s chili for one and it went viral, it got over a million views. And so I was like, well, maybe I’ll turn this into a regular thing. And so I’ve been making them ever since for 10 years. And when the pandemic hit, I wasn’t going to be able to do a lot of the live stuff anymore, or any of it really and and I started kind of looking for a way that I can do more stuff out of home. And so, so I started these two web series, or I continued the Henry’s kitchen and the highway man. And they’re both the exclusive videos come out every month on Patreon. So there’s patreon.com slash Henry’s kitchen patreon.com slash highway, man. But that’s all in the videos. So if people like them, they can subscribe. And then I put them out every month and

matt nappo 1:00:24
every month. That’s pretty aggressive. I have to say, yeah, as a one man production company.

Henry Phillips 1:00:31
Yeah, I keep busy. And then, but but now I’m going back on the road, man. I’ve got a Wichita Kansas, Kansas week, a week and a half from now. And then I’m going to go to St. Louis, to open for a band called Ludo at the pageant theater for a few nights. And then I go to Wisconsin, Western Wisconsin and Wisconsin Rapids to do a couple of rural gigs there and, and then, and then Fresno after that, but I’m finally getting back out there and performing. And it feels good. I’m really happy to

matt nappo 1:01:03
be here for you. I have the link to your website. Yeah, going down there. It’s in the description. Also the links to the Patreon pages for the shows and all that kind of stuff. And I’m imagining I’m guessing the tour dates are on Henry Phelps. Yeah, yeah.

Henry Phillips 1:01:18
Well, it’s a good question, because I’m usually pretty bad about that stuff.

matt nappo 1:01:22
Most comedians aren’t. People in the music industry are cool. I mean, anytime I talk to entertainers on the show, I go to their website, and they say your website is totally outdated. And

Henry Phillips 1:01:36
it’s true. And I’m definitely one of those guys, because I never got to that point where I could get somebody to do it. Right. Most most of my comic friends eventually get to a point where they’ve got somebody who volunteers or somebody who gets a paycheck or whatever, to do all that stuff. But it’s for me, it’s me trying to figure out how to navigate the damn thing, you know, but it’s up to date now. So

matt nappo 1:01:57
yeah, well, I appreciate you being here. Now. I just have to note that you’re the second guest. on my show that has actually been interviewed by Larry King, I find that Yes. Wow. To me is that’s an impressive thing getting interviewed by Larry King, I’m guessing because there was no context to the one I saw. I’m guessing it came out right after punching the clown. That’s one

Henry Phillips 1:02:21
after the second movie. So the second movie punching Henry which by the way, both those movies are on Amazon, if anybody wants to see them, I think you have to pay a couple bucks. But But Amazon. But so punching Henry was done through a studio so that that had an actual budget where they hired a PR person to get me interviews. And Larry King wasn’t on on cable news anymore. But now he was doing it on the internet, and, but still just as cool. And so I was able to sit down with him and do a whole interview. And I think there’s two on YouTube. There’s the full interview. And there’s also like, just a quick q&a one,

matt nappo 1:03:02
right? Well, just and again, I’m trying to be as respectful of your time as possible. But there are a couple of questions I have to ask you about. Sure. First of all, he he seemed like he was reading off of something that is on your Wikipedia page. And that was included in the second one where you’re in the room with the record company executives and they’re talking badly about you they’re talking like a blockhead. Oh, yeah. His two best friends are despair and failure and all this kind of stuff, making you feel like a real loser. And I it says something like in your wiki page or Wikipedia page that Henry is known for playing a character who is a loser, and it’s like, Yeah, but you say I’m right here in the room, and then Larry, Larry King says something like you’re even a failure at that. People have no respect for this guy.

Henry Phillips 1:03:59
Yeah, a failure of being a failure. I don’t even remember that. The exact context of that, but uh, but yeah, so um, I all of the stuff that we talked about Kingdom comedy guy when I was a kid watching Garry Shandling do his stand up, you know, Rodney Dangerfield, these were all the people that I laughed at, you know who I guess their persona was losers, but I loved it. I Bob Newhart was another guy. Albert Brooks, you know,

matt nappo 1:04:30
I was gonna say your filmmaking and your approach to filmmaking and I didn’t want to kind of, because I didn’t know how you would feel about this because of your comparison. But I think when I look at your filmmaking and your approach to filmmaking, be Albert Brooks, influence to me jumped out at me that was the first Yeah, these films make me feel like you know, reminiscent of that kind of delivery, that kind of attitude.

Henry Phillips 1:04:55
Well, yeah, no, I appreciate that. Yeah. Modern Romance would be nice. Number one, you know and then yeah defending your life and loss in America. I mean, I love those movies. But yeah, those guys, I don’t know if I just saw all those people at a time where I was like, Oh, Okay, I get it there’s a world where it’s okay to be a loser and it’s actually encouraged you know, and it’s called comedy you know, and I love it you know, Chris Farley Will Ferrell you know all these guys you know, I mean that’s, that’s what it is, you know?

matt nappo 1:05:32
Right. And before I let you go together thing from the Larry King interview that came out he asked you at one point what would you What would you like to be more successful at I think it’s how we put it and your answer was I’d like to be a better kept actor. Now I think, again, not blowing smoke up your ass but I think you’re a great character actor. It just seems that most often you’re playing yourself as a character but I know you’ve done some other acting things. Anything like that in the horizon? Because I do I do think you have the ability if I read I know your father was a known as a character actor. any of that on the horizon for you other acting work? I’m not Henry.

Henry Phillips 1:06:13
I love the idea of it. But yeah, I guess what I was getting at there is my dad was a character actor. And yeah, that’s in the Wikipedia too. There’s a bigness to what a lot of character actors do that I love. Well, like Rip Torn would be a great examples, right? Like, you know, it’s like, that’s something that you know, if he asked me, What would be something that I wish that I could do that I can’t I’d say it’s that kind of grandiose, sort of character acting where you just command the whole room to you know, you just walk on there and everybody’s like, Oh, yeah, I mean that. That’s fantastic. I don’t feel like I’m that guy. I don’t necessarily aspire to be that right now. What I like I did I did several episodes of Silicon Valley, the show on HBO and I was pretty much I was playing a character for sure. But that character was a little bit of an offshoot of myself, you know, I was just kind of trained to be as dry and real as possible. And yeah, I’m all for doing parts like that. And you know, I’ll keep pursuing it. It’s not it’s not really a and a career that you get to choose whether you get to do it or somebody else has to put you in there stuff. But I

matt nappo 1:07:27
got suckered away. But yeah, yeah, it is fate. And it is a lot of luck and all that stuff that plays into it.

Henry Phillips 1:07:34
But we live in a time where we can make our own stuff which is really helping me out a lot.

matt nappo 1:07:39
I agree I visit that’s a double edged sword you know, and you know, this probably a conversation for another day because I do want to let it go because I you know, I’ve kept your over an hour now. But there, there is a point where all comergence like may say there’s no good music or anymore No good comedy around anymore. It’s just not true. It’s just you have to dig a little harder to find it because a lot of great artists aren’t getting the sweetheart promotional deals from record labels or movie studios. And they have to produce this stuff on their own. So you have to dig a little harder to find it, but it’s out there. So

Henry Phillips 1:08:13
it is out there and word of mouth is the best you know, and you just every time you talk to somebody who’s got similar tastes, just say, Hey, who are you listening to now? or What are you watching or whatever, and that’s the best way to do it.

matt nappo 1:08:26
Right? come to New York sometime soon.

Henry Phillips 1:08:28
Oh, absolutely. I’d love to. I’d love to. Well,

matt nappo 1:08:32
well hey, me. And Tom Kanaka says hello. He’s in the one of the chat rooms he says. Please have Henry back for round two. This was great. Bah bah bah, bah, bah, bah. Thank you, Tom. Thank you again, for hooking this up. Please stay in touch and do feel free to come back anytime you want. I appreciate this morning, you know, and I wish you great continued success and till next time Till we meet again. Be well. That sounds great. I appreciate it. Bye for now. Henry foe folks. Wow, what a great guy. What a great talent. One of the one of the most creative people in the world today. I say that you know, with no exaggeration, I mean, we’ve got a lot of things going on. I didn’t kind of chef, the chef stuff. Listen. The only reason I made that comment in the beginning about the chef stuff is I know a lot of serious chefs who struggle struggle they have YouTube shows and they struggled to get 1000 views and then this was kind of making a joke out of a cooking show getting millions of views. I know my chef friends are very hurt by that. But bad bad is a great stuff too and very entertaining Henry’s kitchen. I hope you’ll check out all the Henry stuff the movies, see the stand up the the music on iTunes and all that kind of stuff. Everywhere you find Henry in so many different creative endeavors. So that’s our show for today. Tomorrow, I have a musical group from LA to boo droz which is a cigar box foot stomp and rock and roll band. Anyway, I hope you will join me then 8pm tomorrow till then I’m Matt nappo for the mind dog TV podcast. Thanks for coming. Have a great night. Bye for now.

Transcribed by https://otter.ai

Brett Erickson – Damn The Consequences

 

Brett Erickson is a comedian and writer based in Austin, Texas. A fearless, back-of-the-room comic’s comic, Brett delivers a dynamic, free-form show that’s consistently out front of anything any other comics are doing. It was just this sort of brave, bold, damn the consequences style that led legendary comedian Doug Stanhope to take notice and call Brett, “one of the funniest comics working today.” Quick on his feet and a great joke writer,

Brett is becoming one of the most popular acts in L.A. with numerous appearances on Roast Battle at The Comedy Store, a competition he has only lost once when he was defeated by a fat, bald jerk who should just go back to London! He is the creator, writer and editor of the satirical Brietbart parody website, Brettbart. A “News” organization that’s been called a brilliant Onion-style takedown of the alt-right.

Follow Brett On Twitter to know when and where he’ll be performing: https://twitter.com/iBrettmypants I

SSUES WITH ANDY PATREON: https://www.patreon.com/Issueswithandy http://www.brettericksoncomedy.com/

MinddogTV PATREON: https://www.patreon.com/minddogtv

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Episode Transcript
matt nappo 0:25
And welcome my friends to yet another episode of the mind dog TV podcast. I’m Matt nappo. Thanks for coming. It’s great to have you here. As always, we’re gonna have some fun tonight. Just a brief programming note before we get started. April Burke was supposed to be with me tomorrow, great comedian, local comedian. She’s not going to make it tomorrow. She’s got some health issues that came up. We will be rescheduling probably early next week, I’ll let you know when that’s gonna happen. We have a great comedian with with us tonight. You know, stand up comedians, generally, for the most part, very intelligent, very smart people. There are a few exceptions. But even like, those few exceptions, are pretty intelligent in in a lot of ways, and some of them are intentionally dumbing down the material to play to a larger audience for a bankroll. So they’re not all that stupid. So let’s just take it on face value that stand up comedians are smarter than the average bear type of person. Now, my guest tonight is known by his peers, his contemporaries and fans. As a very smart comedian, somebody who is very cerebral in his comedy, you need to think about it. You can’t just get her debt. I’m sorry, I didn’t want to go there. But let’s just say he’s smart among the smartest. So it’s my pleasure to have him here tonight. Ladies and gentlemen, please open your ears, open your minds and help me welcome in Brent Erickson to the mind. Oh, TV podcast. Brett, welcome. That’s exactly what I was talking about that bad, bad. trying to think of the look I should have. Well, you see the, the idea. The idea behind that intro is to put all the pressure on you, and all the expectation that you’re going to be really smart and really funny, and zero expectation that I might even come close to being smart or funny. So I

Brett Erickson 2:24
will find out. I can’t I cannot guarantee you that I will be smart, but I can guarantee you. I’ll be drunk.

matt nappo 2:32
Okay. Well. Thanks for having me on. It’s my pleasure to have you on and I got to tell you, bad eight months ago on the show, I made a really bad prediction. I said that. If comedians were stocks, I would urge everybody to put all their money into bread, Erickson, my thinking was that I had heard everybody was making an exodus from LA, which I think is the epicenter of comedy on planet Earth. And go into Austin, Texas, and I said, Brett’s gonna be the only real comedian left in LA. The spotlights gonna be on him. All of a sudden, he’s gonna get all this attention. You can see HBO calling, and he’s gonna have specials. And now I understand you’re in Austin, Texas. Yeah. Yeah. What was that you said about being a smart guy. Wow. Yes, grab that bullshit. I’m in Austin, Texas, man. So what is the aside from any income tax? What is the real benefit of being located in Austin, Texas for the comedian’s.

Brett Erickson 3:36
I can only speak to the real benefit for me being in Austin, Texas. And that is the fact that my wife has been hired to manage Joe Rogan’s new comedy club. So when that happens, you go, Wow, congratulations.

matt nappo 3:51
Congratulations to

Brett Erickson 3:54
you. Wow. Thanks. She’s great. she’s a she’s one of the best goddamn people and bartenders in equal measure that there is and she was the, if you’ve been to the Comedy Store, you may have seen her she ran the VIP comics only bar in the back. And yeah, so you know, she hit it off with all the comics too. And now she’s gonna be running Joe’s club. So that’s pretty exciting. So yeah, so we decided to come to Austin, but I’ll tell you, I do I do enjoy Los Angeles very, very much. So I do miss it.

matt nappo 4:29
Yeah. I didn’t know Rogen was opening the club. Good for him. Yeah. Gotta do something with all that money. Probably. Yeah. And to figure out what what he could do with all that extra gas now. So I understand, I think anyway, I understand because I went to your website to look at dates and I didn’t see it, but I understand you’re going to Alaska. I this is what I

Brett Erickson 4:50
love about you. This is how much of a professional this man is. I looked at on the tweet you put out today about the show, and I looked at my bio that you You, you cut and pasted from my website, and I noticed that you’ve updated it for

a real professional operation. Oh, I already forgot the question. What was it Alaska? You’re going to go into it? Yeah, I don’t here’s the thing. I don’t update my goddamn What? Does anybody updated their actual website anymore? No, I don’t know that they do. I think I already spend more time than I want to on social media. I, I recently have been pulling back from social media, just because I needed to for my head, my brain. And, and I like that when I started out doing comedy, there wasn’t social media, you know, you you called the comedy clubs, you sent them tapes. They hired you. They did the promotion. You went to the show. That was it. I liked it that way. Now, obviously, I you know, old man yelling a cloud right now, but it’s not the way it’s gonna be. But I just you know, there’s just too much of that shit. And I definitely not I didn’t get into stand up comedy to be a website designer. No, I can’t, you know, so I so I don’t so but I but to your question, I do remember it now. This time, I am going to Alaska. I’ll be up in Alaska. Next week at chilkoot. Charlie’s on the 10th 11th and 12th of June so if you got any people up there in Anchorage, come on out. The Kyoko Charlie’s is a legendary place.

matt nappo 6:38
I was looking at my demographics. And my analytics today to notice I have, I think 30 unique listeners. And there you go.

Brett Erickson 6:48
Look, I’m not even lying. Luckily for me, I am just at the level of success where 30 people would make a big difference. So if even some of them come out, that’ll be nice. And our good friend from the issues with Andy podcast, Mr. Greg shaylee. will be there with me in Alaska. And you could see him too.

matt nappo 7:11
If you’ve had. Have you done Alaska before? Many times? Yeah, I’ve been up there a lot. That’s why I’m asking you why I even brought up Alaska. When you go there? And do you feel like you have to make your material even more edgy or as edgy as possible. Knowing the audience is going to be rapists, murderers and killers. Yeah, yeah.

Brett Erickson 7:36
I dial back my, my liberal politics a little bit. Yeah, because everybody’s got a gun.

matt nappo 7:47
Well, I’ve had several guests who went to Alaska and ended up doing eight or 10 years in jail. See, at probably a handful of probably maybe five or six people who actually went to Alaska for a good time or vacation a fishing trip and ended up going to jail for assault, robbery or something. It seems like a very wild west place and doesn’t seem like a good place for it. Yeah,

Brett Erickson 8:15
yeah, I’m not I you know, it’s interesting because shaylee and I and his lovely paramour, Tracy, and a few other friends are going to go after we do the shows. We’re going to get in an RV and we’re going to drive up into Denali National Park to see Mount Denali, the old Mount McKinley, for you old timers, and we’re gonna go camping for a couple of days. And that’s gonna be exciting, because it’s gonna be the summer solstice.

matt nappo 8:43
I bet you The weather is better there than it is here.

Brett Erickson 8:47
It’s amazing. It’s 24 hours of sunlight. And it’ll be you know, nice 50s to 70s I think something like that. I’m guessing I don’t know what the temperature is going to be. But the goddamn sun’s gonna be out at midnight. And I’m excited to see that that’ll be.

matt nappo 9:00
Well, a good luck and I hope I hope you make it back to Austin. I really do and don’t. Don’t go to jail. Don’t hang out with any day. Show.

Brett Erickson 9:09
Here’s the deal. Greg Chaille. used to work at Chilkoot Charlie’s. That’s how he met Doug. Stanhope and Mitch Hedberg and all the guys that he’s worked with through the years and how we ended up meeting. So he’s a veteran. He lived in Anchorage for 10 or 15 years or something like that. And he’s like my little Mount Everest Sherpa. You know what I mean? Like, I’ll stay close to him. I keep a hand on his back. Like I’m a blind man crossing the street. And I’ll make it back to Austin,

matt nappo 9:34
where we keep a hat on and cover cover that because I would think in Alaska probably doesn’t go too well. Yeah,

Brett Erickson 9:41
yeah, he does look like it looks like a chicken just hatching from its egg.

matt nappo 9:48
Yeah. Okay.

Brett Erickson 9:52
Tough to chicken hair popping out.

matt nappo 9:54
Well, it seems like a nice chicken. I I noticed the few times he’s meant to me he’s called it mind Mad Dog radio. Yeah. Which is not good at reading. He’s a bad reader, but actually I he’s kind of psychic because that’s how I got my start. 35 years ago it was mad dog originally and I was on the radio, but he would know that

Brett Erickson 10:17
let’s talk radio where you sound definitely. As soon as I heard your voice, I thought this is definitely a radio guy. Did you know that I was a radio guy. I know that well, maybe maybe if I updated my goddamn website. I have my violin. I was a I did radio in Illinois. I grew up in Illinois and I graduated from college I went and started working in Peoria, Illinois and radio and yeah, big time. And I had a morning radio show at a couple different stations for a while in the 90s. And I thought well this doesn’t seem like it’s going to be around forever radio and and then I got fired from a couple stations and I just said fuck it I’m gonna go do stay I’d been doing I was doing a little stand up as a time just because I had all the I did what you what you’re doing I had all the I interviewed all the comedians on my my radio show I hosted at the club in town. And then when the radio station told me to take a long walk off a short Pier, I said, Alright, I’ll I’ll do stand up for a while. And that was in 1999.

matt nappo 11:26
Yeah, wow. Yeah.

Brett Erickson 11:28
Yeah. I love radio though, man. I loved it. If I didn’t see that, you know, it looks to me like towns like Peoria and even a little bigger. We’re drying up for radio broadcast talent

matt nappo 11:43
everywhere it is and especially at that time with everybody going to satellite and I think satellite is even on its way out now giving away to digital streaming radio and that kind of stuff. But when I was there I got in it for I was doing an overnight show with crazy people. I mean, UFO people Bigfoot people. Go gigs, all that kind of stuff. My dad. Yeah, that’s cool. Right? You an Art Bell fan? You probably get asked this. Yeah, of course. I had him on my show a couple of times interviewed him a couple times. I had the other Art Bell on just a couple of weeks ago via the other Art Bell being the guy who founded Comedy Central. Who’s that? Do I know that? I Belk founded Comedy Central Oh,

Brett Erickson 12:28
there’s a he’s name is actually Art Bell. There’s Yeah. I thought you were gonna tell me you talked to George Nori. No, I

matt nappo 12:37
talked to Jeremy north. No,

Brett Erickson 12:42
I used to love art. Well, I’ll tell you, you probably know this from talking to comics, especially if you talk to guys who were road dogs in the you know, 90s and early 2000s. Art Bell was just a part of it. Because you drove you were always driving overnight somewhere. And this was before you know Sirius XM and all that shit. You just you drive across the Dakotas. And you’d get Art Bell for a while when you were outside of appear. And then you drive and you’d be trying to make it to Bismarck and it fade out a little bit. And then you’d have to tune it in on another thing. And Eddie catch it again for a second. I used to love that shit.

matt nappo 13:17
Yeah, I did too. And I used to travel because I was you know, doing going from different band to different band at that time while he was on the radio. And during the night, he would try to tune him in wherever he could got a little spooky when you were all by yourself sometimes going from two o’clock in the morning and you’re listening to that stuff. Yeah. But what really burnt me out on that it’s just the whole conspiracy stuff. And I thought at that time, it was getting to it was getting over overloaded with conspiracies and people just going nuts and never saw the place where we beat today. Unbelievable. It’s really insane. So and I know that you’re among the let’s bring in that banner. So we can kind of promote the issues with Andy podcast a little bit. Yeah,

Brett Erickson 14:08
take my stupid fucking website down off the bottom of there. I know one don’t go there unless you want to see the updates. on issues with Andy, that’s where you go for

matt nappo 14:19
that. That’s an older picture from about 13 episodes ago, but patreon.com slash issues with any brand is one of the four co hosts on that program. Now, I know where the name came from, but the concept of the show seems to be and maybe I have it wrong. Maybe there was no concept. Let’s again, let’s get together and do a podcast but it seems to be let’s let Andy talk your role seems to be to keep the public informed of where Andy’s going and kind of fill in the gaps of the things he forgets to say and Charlie is there for the comic relief with the images and stuff and then Chad just drinks and smokes, and then when everything is said, Yeah, but what was their intent a content meeting that said, what are we going to do? Or you guys just said that let’s get together and have a podcast? Yeah, it

Brett Erickson 15:10
was definitely more of the latter. And then it just sort of became the Well, I mean, it worked out perfectly, because we ended up calling it issues with Andy because at the beginning, and he kept having problems, figuring out how his computer worked and how Skype and he couldn’t get this and his microphone wouldn’t work. And we would all be there and we could hear him and see him but he couldn’t see us and he’d be going back to me because it is screaming and messing with stuff and we’d laugh at him. So that’s how we came up with the name and then but it it kind of just organically became his vehicle. I mean, it was just for friends hanging out to do a podcast. And it’s just it’s such a good vehicle for the mind for his brain.

matt nappo 15:56
That is

Brett Erickson 15:58
it really just you know, it it I have absolutely no problem. I’ve known Andy for so long. I have a he makes me laugh so hard that I have no problem. I don’t consider it taking a backseat. It’s more like this show is like Abbott Abbott, Abbott and Costello and it takes three Abbott’s to rein in one Costello in this case, because Andy’s fucking crazy but in a beautiful mind sort of way. And I think we described at one time as, as the three of us exist as those, those rubber bumpers that they put in the bowling alleys when the kids are bowling. The ball doesn’t always go in the gutter. Ghandi will be telling a story and he hits the gutter over here. And then we got to bounce him back into the middle of the lane. Then he hits it over here. We send him back this way. And it’s a damn blast. I love it.

matt nappo 16:53
Yeah, well, I have to say and no smoke. It’s the absolute best use of podcast technology ever got it? You know, it’s I don’t know if it was accidental. But it’s a stroke of genius, the way he is allowed to just kind of freestyle and you guys serve your roles. I noticed on a episode about three weeks ago that you and I were in sync on a therapeutic level of Oh, wait a minute, we’ve had a breakthrough here. When Andy was talking about porn film, he got aroused. As a young man about running at Marilyn chambers running at the same moment and hit me it’s like, wait a minute. This means something we’ve we’ve cracked the guy’s psyche a little bit. Has he developed and grown from that from that piece of it?

Brett Erickson 17:48
You know, that particular piece of enlightenment? I’m not sure sometimes I think it he’s a little bit like a bucket with a hole in it.

You know, like, you fill it up at full and then it’s not full again, you got to fill it back up. He so I don’t know that he keeps it connected. But that was something because I’ve I’ve been with him. I’ve traveled with him numerous times. And he’s that’s not new behavior. Being always being close to running out of gas. And then when we find out that was the plot of the very first porn he watched with free molesting him, it was like, whoa, wait a minute here. I’m not a fucking psychologist. But I think we might have gotten to something.

matt nappo 18:29
I think if you came across as somebody who had some therapeutic cognitive therapy training or

Brett Erickson 18:35
something. It’s not that you know what it is? It’s comedy training. Because all as I was thinking callback, that’s a callback to an earlier joke. on an earlier episode, it just happened to you know, it’s like the Venn diagram where comedy callback and therapy crossover and that was the middle part right there. And that was great. Great. Good. Andy was on here before, right?

matt nappo 19:00
Oh, yeah. Yeah, I love Andy and I was trying to be be you three guys and try to just let him talk that whole time. But it’s such an interesting guy and what uh, what, uh, you know, I tell my wife stories about his life is like, because people think I’m interesting, you should write a book. It’s like, you gotta you gotta check out issue for fun. I had a psychic on the program who wanted to do a reading for me. And she said, I might embarrass you. I think you’re afraid to let me talk. Talk about your secrets. I said, No, I’m an open book. And she started talking about some of the shit that she picked up on me. And, and then I said, you know, yeah, you could say that. But I and here’s the real deal. And I told her, and she went, Wow, sorry to hear that. And basically, I said, well, everybody’s got some fucked up shit, right? Not that fucked up.

Brett Erickson 19:53
Well, you could write it all down, but just don’t put the book out till you’re dead. You know what I mean? Yeah, yeah. You never No.

matt nappo 20:00
So you talked about callback to another joke. Where, as I mentioned, you are a cerebral comic. Now, a lot of the things. If I compared you to the like the blue collar, guys, you’re you have, you have to come with your brain intact. You can’t be too stoned to go to your show, and think you’re gonna laugh a lot, because you have to think about it. This, you mentioned earlier, you know, 30 people would make a big difference at this point in your career. Do you think because you you don’t compromise and don’t dumb it down? That hurt your career at all?

Brett Erickson 20:35
Ah, maybe? I don’t know. But I don’t. I don’t do it. I don’t, I don’t think about it like that. You know what I mean? And I don’t I don’t measure success in in just in dollars. I, I am a happy person. And that’s what I do fuck about I I started doing comedy in the late 90s. And I just did it in the Midwest because I have two kids and I was divorced. And I were had joint custody of these kids. And I was doing the road all the time. And I just wasn’t home very much. So then I I stopped doing the road all the time, I got a full time construction job. I worked at the comedy club on the weekends, and I stayed in Peoria, I went to volleyball games and soccer games and and you know, Christmas programs and shit like that. And that hurt my career more than anything that had more than, you know, cerebral comedy or whatever. That hurt my career. But it made me a happy person. So there’s no way I would do it any different. I have a great relationship with my kids. They’re there. They’re healthy, well adjusted adults. And it you know, after they both were out of high school, and they were in college, and often different cities doing their own thing. That’s when the the old lady and I picked up and took off and went to LA. So you know, I’ve only been really attacking comedy full time in these last few years in LA and now Austin. So you know that that’s it? If I had, you know, I don’t regret it is what I’m saying. I have I’ve had a blast, and I still get to do the comedy I get to do. I’m, I’m happy with the results. You know what I mean? I I don’t answer to anybody else. I do it the way I want to do it. And guess what else when I don’t feel like doing it? I don’t fucking do it. It gets like, I work with some of these guys in LA and I have the utmost respect for some of these kids hustle like you have never fucking seen there. They do three or four mics and night, their fucking lives or stand up comedy. And I respect that. And I think that’s amazing. It just ain’t who I am. I don’t give a I don’t give that much of a fuck. I like it. But I like doing other shit too.

matt nappo 22:59
Oh, God, attitude, man. I relate to that in a big way. And I’ve tried to tried to preach that to some people. Not that I yeah, everybody’s different. You know, everybody’s got to do what they like to do. But, you know, I’ve had a lot of musicians who crave fame. And I like, you know, I’ve been down that road and chased fame when I was young. But I’ve seen it destroy people’s lives, too. So I got happy being a club level musician, staying within the tri state area here and not going out and being national stuff. Because Yeah, as long as it makes me happy doing what I do when I want to do it, and I pick and choose the work I want to take and not necessarily just taking stuff to keep working and stuff. Yeah, I think that that is a much better way to stay happy if you’re of that mindset now.

Brett Erickson 23:45
Yeah. You know, I mean, I, I wish I could claim some sort of, you know, philosophical genius and understanding, it just sort of worked out that way. You know what I mean? Like, I fell, I kind of fell into the right decision. I didn’t feel like with my kids, I had much of a choice. But you know, I felt good about it. Like, I like my kids. I like hanging out with them. So you know, it was all good. And that it’s been a perfect kind of recipe for me, you know? Right. So

matt nappo 24:16
So, with that approach now, when you’re on stage, and I haven’t seen you live well, I’ve seen you stand up is to video. So I don’t know, I’ve never been in the same room and I know it’s different there. But it seems to me your confidence with your material. And this might be just smoke and mirrors because you don’t you know, you never see in your psyche. But you seem extremely confident more so than a lot of comedians with the ability to let a premise breathe and set up something and give it a second to sink in. where other people are just and we talk about Radio fraid of dead air. You seem to be very comfortable with putting that out there. Am

Brett Erickson 24:58
I wrong? You’re not wrong. I’ll tell you what, that’s a really good observation. And it’s the radio thing that drove me to it. Because when I started doing stand up, I was definitely not comfortable with that silence because of the radio, you cannot have dead air. You know, I still have dreams, where I’m working at a radio station, and it’s my, like, my first day, and I can’t, I can’t remember the call letters. I, I can’t I can’t find the song. Like, when I started doing radio, we still had the songs were on the eight, like the eight track style cartridges, the big carts, they were great, you know, like, we had a rack of them, you know, 600 songs on carts. And we had these, like eight track player kind of things where you shoved them all in and you hit the button, and it would start. And you know, you had like, Oh, your you got your song list for the hour. And you’d go back to your rack, and you’d get, oh, this song, and then this songs next, and then song and you’d come over and you’d have a stack

of fucking songs and you set them right here, and you put the first one in, and you’d hit it. And Hey, everybody, here we are. And my dream is that I cannot find the songs. I can’t find where the music is, where is it? And the song that is ending, there’s a song ending, right, and it’s time and I can’t remember the call letters. And that fear of that still

is in my brain. I can’t

dream. Now. I don’t have scary dreams like that about stand up. I don’t know what it is. I started doing stand up at the club in Peoria, the jukebox comedy club. And I just I kind of like said fuck it and dove into that where I just there was a there was a one comic from Chicago. I think he’s probably retired now because he was an older guy, but a really funny guy. If you could find him online. I don’t even know if he has anything online. But the guy’s name is Paul Kelly. And if you talk to Chicago, comedians, they’ll tell you that he was a legend back in the 80s and 90s. And he would go up there sometimes. And he would just stand there for the first 60 seconds without saying anything. And it was mortifying. He was so comfortable that but by the end of it, everyone was laughing. He hadn’t said anything. Everyone was just laughing. Because he just kind of did that for a little while just kind of kept looking at everybody. And he looked at somebody for a little bit more. And he was so everyone was like, What is happening? Everyone got really nervous. You could see everyone get go anxious and afraid. Why isn’t he talking and then, oh, he’s doing this on purpose. And they’d kind of kind of calm down a little bit and relax. And then once they get comfortable in it, and they see that you’re not afraid of it, then they get comfortable. And then they can relax, let their guard down. And now you can talk to them about anything. Because they’re because you’ve broken through that. That wall.

matt nappo 27:49
The first guy I ever saw do that was Andy Kaufman, but he never he never took it. And he basically stayed in. Yeah, in that weirdness for a long time. There were times where before he actually was on Saturday Night Live and Johnny Carson, where we’d see him in New York City and basically walk out of there like what the fuck was that a comedy show or not? And he loved that stuff. But yeah, wrestle women? What that was Oh, yeah. Would it be fair to say that you I think it’s fair to say that you’re the most politically vocal of the four people for a host of issues with Andy. Maybe

Brett Erickson 28:34
Andy, Andy is pretty hardcore. Hardcore is not the right word. And it is his second minute

matt nappo 28:43
to the issues that matter to him.

Brett Erickson 28:45
He’s, he’s got it in, it’s infused into his point of view as well. Now, it comes out in different ways. So mine, for me is probably or at least it has been in the past a little more direct. It’s interesting because this now that you say this is because this will be fun. If anybody’s in Alaska wants to come see me. I’m trying to get away. I’m gonna try to get away from some of that. I’m gonna try. I feel like this whole pandemic, this whole crazy fucking thing. Everything has changed. You know, in my in my world. I went from, you know, working at the Comedy Store in Los Angeles. feeling like I was right there. And I loved it. I loved it. And then all of a sudden pandemic hits everything shut down. Is California gonna open back up? I don’t know Joe Rogan leaves. He comes out here. He’s gonna open up a new club. He calls my my wife. He’s like, Hey, you want to be? Yes, we do. So like, it’s like this whole new rebirth. And I think my favorite comedian of all time is George Carlin. And what I loved about George Carlin was he had that, that that you know, that societal bang. He, you know, he was a philosopher, he told you what he thought about the way the world was fucked up. And and how you were a part of that. And I love that. But he was also a had a lot of material that was silly, and and inward looking. Right. And that interests me and I’ve never gone that direction. So I’m trying to push myself into that area. Now I feel like because here’s the deal, I got to write a whole new Act, because I don’t remember what the fuck I was talking about before the pandemic hit. So there’s no chance in going back to any material that I had before. So it started over time. So, you know, I’ve been working on some new stuff, and I’m going to try to drive it into the, you know, kind of more about the stuff we all share. Personally, we’ll see what happens

matt nappo 30:53
I have you been on. Since the limited to

Brett Erickson 30:56
six minutes into the first set, I’m going to go right back to calling Trump a cocksucker.

matt nappo 31:03
I would give you credit for less than six minutes. Because I know myself that you haven’t been on stage since a lot.

Brett Erickson 31:13
I have a couple times. I’ve done a couple sets here in Austin. And did a set in one set in San Diego before I left. And a car and I did the Comedy Store a couple of times Comedy Store opened up a little bit back in the fall when they were trying don’t mean Oh, we thought we were going to open it and then it hit hit again. So I did some sets there but it’s that was all really weird. You know what I mean? It’s I feel like now it’s starting to be a little more like it was people at least here. I’m in Austin. I’ve been going to shows every night that it’s fucking over here. Whether it is or not. They’re acting like it’s done. Everything’s wide open. Yeah, there’s no nobody’s wearing masks inside anymore. I’m vaccinated. I’m not worried about it. I don’t know what your thoughts are on all of this. But my feeling is at this point there are vaccines available for pretty much everybody you can get one if you want one go get one if you don’t want one, don’t get it.

matt nappo 32:10
I agree and that’s why I that’s why I brought up the political whether it because you are Oh, at least on Twitter, sometimes you share your opinions. And I think it was just yesterday that you shared one that now edge. It’s surprising to me, but not so surprising to me that you started out sounded like a libertarian yesterday, didn’t I? Well, not such a libertarian. But I think the lines both that people used to define a liberal conservative is so fucking blurred now. Yeah, I mean, I don’t blame it all on Trump. I think Trump amplified that it started before Trump, that whole worrying of the lines between what’s a conservative and what’s a liberal, but you started out by qualifying it that I’m as liberal as an undocumented or whatever. And then I happen to agree with Ted Cruz. And I was in Texas for a couple weeks. Fucking Republican. I don’t think he knows what he’s saying. Yeah, well, let me just say this. Fuck Ted Cruz, right. Yeah.

Brett Erickson 33:13
So I mentioned my, my children, one of my children is an ICU nurse, my daughter, my pride and joy. I love them both. But I like my daughter more. she’s a she’s an ICU nurse, she has been dealing with pandemic from the start 12 hour shifts every day for PP, you know, putting people on ventilators taught her helping people talk to their family on FaceTime, possibly for the last time all these terribly heavy stories for a long time during it, it was you know, she would call she would be crying sometimes to having to, you know, find the strength to go back and keep doing this and put yourself through this emotional roller coaster. And they never, we it was always very hectic and very busy, but they never got quite got overwhelmed. And now it’s flattened out. Those are the people I worry about. And that’s what I was saying yesterday when I said get the back end or don’t because it before it was Hey, everybody, let’s get the vaccine because we have to get enough people vaccinated that we that we don’t overwhelm the hospitals because if you do end up and we kind of lost sight of this, I feel like at the beginning of the pandemic, this idea that that the real the real danger of this pandemic is that everybody gets Coronavirus at once because if everybody gets it at once, a whole bunch of people are going to die who don’t have to die. And that’s the point. So if we’re to the point now where no matter what happens, the hospitals won’t be overwhelmed. The health care system can handle it. So if you want a vaccine, go get it if you don’t want it, don’t get it but if you get it and then if you get Coronavirus and you end up in the hospital. That’s a tragic story for you. And your friends and your family but it’s not a tragic story for me because it’s not making my life any any worse. Exactly.

matt nappo 35:07
Yeah, it makes total sense. And this is why I say you’re you’re one of the smarter comedians out there because I don’t think people out there because I don’t think a lot of people really kept sight of that. You’re right. I think we lost. The goal was to flatten the curve we flattened six months ago, right? I played a show Thursday night. 1800 people one guy had a mask on it’s like, what the fuck good. Is that gonna blow his nose too. It’s like he’s just comfortable with it. Yeah, well, I think there’s there’s some of that too, and some of it is still fear driven people going through you know, I think it’s over here. The hospitals are certainly not overwhelmed here. Yeah. But people are still going to the store is fully messed up and I I’m afraid to walk in the store without a mask on just because of the social kickback I’m going to get over it right. So I’d rather walk in with my pants off than a mask off it. I think I’d take less less flak from it. I went to Trader Joe’s and I didn’t get Coronavirus but I think I got herpes. So you know working that stuff. You know and I we mentioned kind of before we went on the air talking a little bit about common friend Brandon walls now. He you know, I don’t never know when to take Brendan seriously. So he was on Twitter talking about people. He goes on and talks about people shooting joke about Coronavirus and then the next thing I know he’s dropping a Coronavirus sex tape where COVID sex tape or not sex tape well sex worker called sex co Yeah. where he’s the doctor in the guys got in and he’s like, Oh,

Brett Erickson 36:53
I love that man so much. It’s ridiculous. I i’ve been it’s been a joy to know that dude, he is a little bit crazy and ways the funniest goddamn comedian in Los Angeles. And I don’t know why he is not world famous. I mean, he’s comics know him. You know him. Some of your fans probably know him. But not enough people do. That guy is goddamn brilliant. I love them.

matt nappo 37:19
I agree. I’m surprised by that as well. And I, you know, I’m surprised by so many communities, and here’s the thing, you know, and we’re gonna get to the canceled culture stuff in now. But canceled culture can mean so many things. But in a time where it’s getting really hard for comedians to know, where they should draw lines anymore, and I’m against even any kind of rat Frank bastard bringing the camera into a comedy club to begin on. But in a time when we see it getting harder and harder to know what you can do in a comedy club. We’re seeing also seeing more comedians than ever coming out and, and becoming stand up comics more than ever, I think I never seen somebody standing. So it’s kind of an odd thing that the harder it gets, the more restrictive the art form gets, the more people are coming out to do it.

Brett Erickson 38:10
Yeah. Well, there are so many comedians now. And this is part of what feeds into kancil culture. There are so many comedians now that well, first of all, there’s some that shouldn’t be comedians and not because they’re not funny. I don’t care about that you can either learn to be funny, or you can be not funny and just fail at it forever. That’s also fine. Do whatever you want. But there are so many comedians that that they have to turn on each other. They have to cut people loose. You know what I mean? Like, comedians are always looking to get rid of somebody because it’ll just they think that’ll make their you know, it’ll make that easier for them to get booked, because they just got rid of that guy, and he’s not going to get booked anymore. It doesn’t work that way. But there is a I can see why people think that that’s the way it is because there’s just so many. I mean, I would be at the Comedy Store, Monday night Comedy Store in Los Angeles, they do potluck, which is the open mic night you go in, you sign up, and if they draw your name, they drop 20 names, and you get three minutes. So 20 people three minutes, it’s two hours long. And they would have anywhere from 180 to 225. people show up every Monday for 20 spots. And that’s a lot of goddamn people. And that’s just that’s not that’s just the brand new comedians, like that’s just the new group. There’s also, you know, here’s what I used to tell people back in Illinois after I moved to Los Angeles, when they would ask me how it was going, I would say, well, it’s comedy in Los Angeles and New York is I’m sure the same way. You know, it’s sort of a good news, bad news sort of thing. The good news is that 90% of the comedians in Los Angeles are terrible. I know, the bad news is that the other 10,000 are really, really good

matt nappo 40:14
right? Now. So

Brett Erickson 40:15
I mean, I couldn’t go, I would be in Los Angeles, I could go to a show every single night of the year. And I would I could go to a different venue every time, and I would be guaranteed to see at least one comedian that I had never heard of, that would be fucking amazing. And then you start to go, Oh, my God, like, how do you do this? How do you find your way? Because there there are a lot of people doing it. And a lot of them are really, really bad, but there’s still a lot left that are really fucking good. And you’re just blown away and it’s just, you’re like, wow, geez, I should just go get a job at fucking Best Buy or something. I can’t compete with these people. The way it is, I’m glad of it because it makes the art form stronger and better. And I’d love great comedy and I saw a lot of it in Los Angeles, but it’s disheartening when you think that somebody is going to come knocking on your door to make you famous and you realize Holy shit, I’m good the back of this fucking line.

matt nappo 41:20
But okay, I get that the the influx of new talent, new new people, new blood is going to push the art form ahead. But then you also have that canceled culture thing, which kind of in my mind stifles art and stifles it in a big way. And I think it was Seth Rogen last week who was talking about comedians need to get over. Your jokes don’t age well, and I don’t think it’s a bad jokes. Aging. Well, it’s I think it’s about new jokes, being afraid to be born. Because they’re being a board. We’re having a massive portion of comedy. Because we’re afraid of I can’t go there. I can’t go there.

Brett Erickson 41:59
Now. I think you might be right about that. It’s the self censoring thing. That’s the real problem. You know, I mean, do you see what happens to some comedians who, you know, make, sometimes it’s as simple as it is, you know, sometimes it’s comedian is pushing the envelope, and, you know, trying out new things. And sometimes a comedian just makes a mistake. It happens people are, comedians are fucking human. Right? So and then. And sometimes, when you’re pushing the envelope, you also make a mistake. It’s the two things together. And when those two things happen at the same time, bingo, you’ve got a viral goddamn video sometimes. And then that person’s like, Oh, I didn’t mind. And if that and if that sort of reaction, which is all negative ends up stifling that artists creativity, then that’s, that’s bad. That’s bad. That’s, that’s not helping. So I think that’s right, it right. That’s, it’s especially bad for that artist. And it doesn’t matter if it’s stand up comedy, or, or a YouTube show, or radio or painting or whatever. origami, whatever your art is, when you stop trying things that interest you. Because you’re afraid someone won’t like you for it. You’re doing a bad job as an artist, so it’s hard to stay focused on, on that, especially when a lot of these guys, they start they’ll lose a lot of money.

matt nappo 43:41
Right? Well, I’m gonna I’m gonna circle back here to what you just said about comedians thinking that if I get so and so cut him out, that’s gonna make more bookings. For me, it seems to me whether it’s politics, or Comedy or Musical, whatever it is, when things get canceled. It’s the people of peer group that’s canceling them. So when the Tony Hinchcliffe thing, the people who are most vocal and and angry about it, what comedians, they were lining up with paying or whatever, but and you see it in politics, too. If people are like, somebody on the right says something or get cancelled on YouTube, it’s because the people on the left kind of ganged up on but political people. And it’s the same thing with comedy. Same thing with musicians with peer groups, and not knowing that they’re killing their own golden goose. Because if I sent her what he says, Now, when I go on stage, I should know that that light is gonna in a microscope, be pointing on me, but people don’t seem to get that. Do you? Do you feel like it’s peer?

Brett Erickson 44:43
relay? Oh, no, absolutely, absolutely. They in a lot of ways they can’t wait to to cancel somebody to do say, Hey, good, fuck you beat it. And in Tony’s case, a lot of people don’t like Tony. That’s just that His personality, he’s a cocky son of a bitch. So he rubs a lot of people the wrong way. So when they saw that video, they were like, great, you know, but but Tony is, is just playing a part like a wrestler, he’s that he’s the bad. He’s the villain on the, you know, in wrestling. And that’s all it was. And he seems to bounce back from it. In fact, I just went to the recording of the first kill Tony episode that so he’s back. So I don’t know, when I

matt nappo 45:29
started being promoted today. And I was happy to see that, you know, I’m not a huge huge fan of his but I I was definitely on his side of that whole thing. I just think it should be a personal matter and I I’m don’t give the benefit of the doubt that you do to paying. I think it was enough. I did was

Brett Erickson 45:56
I was I felt like, I seem to me that the argument that I tried to make was that Tony was just joking. And and that’s what I was trying to point out. And I I thought I laughed at paying. I sat there and and I had some I laughed at him. So I felt like if I had said anything other than he did a good job. I would have been that would have been dishonest of me now, as far as the as far as the filming it and who filmed it? And how did he get that film? And why did he edit it? You know, why did he cut it off when he cut it off? And all of that stuff? That’s a whole nother discussion. And and he doesn’t look great in those discussions, frankly. Yeah. You know, I it’s just the whole thing. It just sucks. here’s the here’s the fucking thing. All right. It’s there’s a difference between saying something, you know, and being racist. I don’t like racism. Racism is fucking stupid. But anything you say anything you say, from the stage of a stand up comedy show shouldn’t count outside of the realm of stand up comedy. Some, if someone had an issue with Tony Hinchcliffe calling Peng? Dang it, you can bleep this out if you need to a filthy chink. And then and they have a problem with that. Because Tony didn’t clear that with paying first and he wasn’t exactly in on the bit to start with. And it wasn’t all completely pre planned. It was just kind of winging it and go valid complaint. But if you think that, that that it’s a problem, because he really thinks that and he’s really promoting that that idea, then you are then you’re don’t ever go to a stand up comedy show because you’re going to ruin it. Because it’s a stand up comedy, everything. It’s like, it’s you didn’t hold Carroll O’Connor liable for what he said is archie bunker, it was within the context of a show, a show that has beats that has that has punch lines that has setups and premises. It’s all fiction. So it’s unfair to the the artist to draw from their their art, you know, things that you think about them. In reality, there are two things are separate. It’s stand up fucking comedy, and that and that really, really was the issue for me. So I just wanted everyone to understand, because this is the other part that I saw by that, you know, I’m watching if I can, that, that prick on TMZ like, you know, clutching his pearls over the comment that he’s like, oh, not only did he say that, but but then listen to the audience. Like they’re all they’re all laughing like that was another, you know, another statement, a barometer of how far we’ve sunk in America because we were laughing at just blatant racism. No, we were laughing because we could tell in the room in the context of everything that was happening, that it was a fucking joke that I didn’t mean it. That’s why we were laughing. The laughter from the audience should have been the clue to you that the person watching the video that this was a joke and it wasn’t real. So you know that.

matt nappo 49:39
And I that’s exactly what I said when I said basically what you’re doing is indicting everybody who was in that room laughing. And I happen to know one of the people who was in that room with you. And I said, and if you look at his Twitter feed, you know, this guy’s not gonna laugh at racist material. So you’re you’re condemning this whole room of people because you didn’t need one grown up. or anything like that. And then there’s the fact that is five days or four days, he could have called a new Tony Hinchcliffe well enough to call him up and say I was hurt by what you said. And at least give him some heads up. I’m gonna talk totally destroyed, tried to destroy your career to boost my likes in

Brett Erickson 50:18
motion. And it’s interesting that you mentioned Brendan Walsh earlier because the same thing happened to Brendan Walsh not too long ago where it was it was a bit of a different situation where he was hosting a show at the Hyperion theater in LA, with Brendan small, the guy who created metalocalypse, right? I say that right? A very, very funny guy and a great musician. And they were doing a show called Bren today and Brendan and Brendan, and it was like this silly Lark kind of a show where they were basically what’s that, like Kathie Lee and Hoda, it was like, the fourth hour of Good Morning America where the hosts are kind of drunk on rosae and a little bit silly. And that’s that was the the vibe of the show. And Brandon was playing this guy who was a complete idiot. I mean, he everything he said was stupid, just the same kind of dumb stuff he does with the, you know, he’s always dressed like a neck brace on and he’s. And he’s that, and he introduced I can’t remember the girl’s name now, but he introduced some girl by commenting on her great tits. And then she did the show never said anything to him. She was even in, even in one of her bits. She sat on a guy’s lap, and it was like stroking his hair. Like, she was not offended that night, in any way. She knew Brendan was joking. And then a couple of days later, she wrote this blog. And you know, if you type out the words, he said, they look bad. And then she didn’t say who it was. She just said it was prominent la comedian. And then everybody jumped in I Oh, my God, this is the problem. See, women are they they’re constantly being viewed as as bodies and not brains, and blah, blah, blah. And then Brendan finally came out and said, Look, it’s me that she’s talking about, and I was Bob, you know, I was doing this as part of a character or whatever. And then all the people who knew Brandon kind of switched and went, Oh, yeah, that makes sense. But

matt nappo 52:25
that makes perfect.

Brett Erickson 52:25
But by that time, the Hyperion theater had already cancelled the show, Brandon small and Brendan Walsh don’t do a show together anymore. And it’s a fucking shame, because that was a really, really funny show in Los Angeles. And those two guys together, were fantastic. And somebody killed it. And in both in Tony Hinchcliffe case, with the guy who accused him of racism, and the woman who accused Brendon Walsh of being a sexist pig, both of them did it solely to advance their careers to be to be a victim of something to in order to put your name out there more. That sucks. Don’t do it.

matt nappo 53:04
It doesn’t last either. I mean, you see that, and I don’t even want to say his name, but the guy who targeted Hinchcliffe, he’s, he’s already kind of forgotten. Yes, he had 5000 followers in a single day on Twitter. And then it leveled off and he hasn’t had a new one since so well.

Brett Erickson 53:21
He’s got no material. He’s new here. He was in a perfect position because he was getting spots. He’d go up on kill Tony, this is a good thing. You’re in there, you’re in the community you want to be in. And what he did is he took a shot, he took his shot to man, it was like it. I mean, I look, I don’t know the guy. So you know, whatever

matt nappo 53:46
I was, I was one of the 12 people in America who was familiar with his comedy before that date. Oh, really? Yeah. And I had seen some of his stuff. And it was all about race, all about China being Chinese and the Asian experience. And I know for a fact that he had heard that word before. Because when Tommy Chung was on this program, he used it a number of times to describe themselves. And I know he watched that program because I had been in contact with him. So he likes to he lied to TMZ TMZ. Exactly. You know it, but it bothers me to see that kancil culture is still going on. And that I can’t talk sense into people who don’t see that if you push this on your peers, it’s gonna come back on you. It’s just the natural thing you kill with killing your own golden goose. And see that it’s because I’m a huge fan of comedy, and I want to see it continue to grow. And I think it’s not gonna if we more comedians embrace this thing to get their enemy or the competition, it’s just gonna kill it for everybody and it’s a very sad So it is

Brett Erickson 55:00
it’s a shame that we that we try to cut out. People, we don’t want success for other people, you know how I don’t know if anybody out there watching this is in the same sort of line of work where, where you, you have a colleague who has some success, and they tell you about the success and you’re happy for them, but a little part of you dies, like, because it wasn’t you it was them instead of you. That’s all it’s comedy is a hard business, because there’s a lot of that, you know, I I’m I’m far enough along in it that I see, a lot of good things happen to a lot of good people. And I see a lot of good things happen to people who I think frankly, don’t deserve it. So you have to keep your mind in the right place. And that’s not always easy to do. And that’s what, that’s what leads to this sort of shit. Where are we, where we’re happy to cut somebody loose without we don’t even want to know the context. Because we know that if we find out the context, we won’t want to do it anymore. So we got to cut the person loose, and get these numbers down so that we have a better chance of, of success. And you know what, here’s the thing, there’s enough success out there for everybody. It’s not I win and you lose, we can both win. That’s That’s how entertainment works.

matt nappo 56:17
And generally, I will say this generally, because it’s not always the case, you can’t worry about somebody else’s success. If that you know, you feel they don’t deserve it. But if the phoniest will expose themselves over time, I look at Milli Vanilli and people were really, really jealous of them when they had number one hits. But then, you know, when when they got exposed as being fake, their career was over instantly. And so that happens to a lot of people who are phony, you can’t worry about them, you have to worry about yourself and your own success. Absolutely.

Brett Erickson 56:48
Right. Somebody and somebody having success doesn’t mean you can’t have success. It’s not a zero sum game.

matt nappo 56:55
Right? Yeah, well, that’s a problem. We tend to look at everything as limited resources, but in certain areas that is true. I mean, we’re here on Long Island where New York where we used to have a probably 30 comedy clubs on Long Island, I think there may be three or four now and instead so it is it is a very

Brett Erickson 57:16
you’re gonna find more coming back. I think that you know, I read some stories. I don’t know if you’ve talked about this at all, but I read some stuff about how you know after the pandemic in 1918 when that kind of finally ended and everybody came out of it that led into the roaring 20s and the Charleston and everybody party and I think you’re gonna see some of that same sort of, you know, revival when we all finally get all the way back I think I hopefully you’ll see some more comedy clubs I certainly enough goddamn comedians to fill them

matt nappo 57:45
are no doubt about that. That roaring back type of because several months ago now, you know, we were still wearing masks to the club, get in the club, we’d be playing. And people were supposed to be wearing masks at the table in the masks. Were coming off there with dancing that being told, you know, try try not to let people sing along a dance. That’s like don’t Don’t, don’t make people laugh. No dancing, no dancing and singing. But people were having Minaj I was on the dance floor. This is like, and so that roaring back and ready to go. You lock people up for a year and a half when it’s bad. go wild man. Right? Yeah. So are you looking forward to getting you know, the Alaska trip with excite?

Brett Erickson 58:32
Absolutely, absolutely. The Alaska trip and then we’ll get back here. The club that Joe’s opening up will be opening up sometime this summer. So I’m very excited about that. Austin is is a really, really cool place. I know that everybody who already lives here is pissed off that we came. And I don’t blame them. I get it. You know, you got a cool thing going here. And now a bunch of assholes from California, New York just invaded your city. But it’s very cool. So there’s a lot of new clubs popping up here. A lot of places to go up and do stand up and there’s music everywhere. I think that’s gonna be like that all over the place. So I hope that wherever you are, if you’re out there, get out there enjoy some stand up comedy. Go see some live music. Go see somebody read goddamn poems just get out of the damn house.

matt nappo 59:19
Jay. Yeah, I agree. And I hope that happens too. I mean, it’s it’s been really it’s been open here. I’ve been playing since last Memorial Day. So it’s been a year since I’ve been out back performing every week. But it just went we finally lifted the mask mandate and all that stuff a couple of weeks ago. People are still a little shy about it. But I think that roaring 20s thing is, is Yeah, we’re going to happen and

Brett Erickson 59:47
I everybody comes out of the pandemic in their own way. Right, right. I mean, like, everyone, here’s how I don’t know how graphic we can get on your show. Can we get graphic on your show here? Here’s how you can tell you’re all the way over to pandemic. Here’s how you know that you’re done with it. When you get back to as eating, I think that’s when you know, you’re willing to just bury your face in some stranger’s ass. You are past wearing a mask, you know what I mean? Like I made it you are out you’re through the other side. Right? So that won’t be your barometer. Everybody.

matt nappo 1:00:27
One of the guests on the program, not too long ago told me about a guy who went to eat her ass on the first date. And I was like, wow.

Brett Erickson 1:00:36
These kids, man, these kids are wild. I used to do a bit about that, but how, like, because they get right in there. Remember? We used to do a two we call them rim jobs because you stayed around the outside you just sort of dabble. They’re just not for me. That’s not for me. I’m just you know,

matt nappo 1:00:59
it’s a little much. So um, and I know we’re over the eating I’m sorry to end we’re not gonna we’re gonna go a couple more minutes because because just just to watch that PE S Yeah, I didn’t even go to this one.

Brett Erickson 1:01:13
No, see, that’s the thing. If you if you get if it tastes that you went too far, if you taste anything, that’s alright. Because

matt nappo 1:01:23
you’re you’re absolutely right. I never I just want to say that my sponsors I we didn’t read the sponsor point at the beginning of the program because the sponsors asked me to bring it in and try to incorporate the guests with it and I blew past it didn’t even look at it. We’re an hour in and I never even mentioned entice me where you get your non toxic sex toys. The link is in the description as well. The idea is sex toys are made out of the same toxic materials that they banned from children’s toys so children children will put stuff in their mouth but sex toys are still continually made of that toxic stuff and people are putting mud plugs in and vibrators and all that kind of stuff. And

Brett Erickson 1:02:04
yeah, that’s a real those are real sensitive areas of your body to write obviously any orifice is going to have sore you know things that are delicate and shouldn’t be you know exposed to these chemicals. I enticed me

matt nappo 1:02:19
entice me enticed me calm links in the description and and so basically check them out if you want to save your butthole from toxic chemicals. And and get a bad day. Get a bad day. You know, I’ve heard I’ve heard about this and I know your pal Andy is colonoscopy today, but the benefits of but they really do. Unbelievable.

Brett Erickson 1:02:45
I It is unbelievable to me. I got a video a couple years ago just like people think oh, I didn’t even really know exactly what it was but the kind that I got that you can get the handheld one you just spray your butt don’t get that if you’re not a hillbilly spraying yourself down with the garden hose out in the yard. Get you can but you can add one to your toilet where it’s just you. You’re sitting there you’re done with doing your business and then you just press a button and clean fresh water sprays up on there and you just kind of scoot around a little bit cleans off your butt and when you go when you go to the toilet paper it’s just too dry and I thought to myself well why why have we been doing this the whole time because

matt nappo 1:03:29
it’s so much more economical I mean ecological

Brett Erickson 1:03:35
Yes Don’t be a danger dangerous it’s dangerous you’re just smearing stuff around up there you don’t do that so you get a bad day then you get a nice non toxic entice me deal though you get a bad day you clean your butthole all up you get a nice non toxic entice me dildo and RAM that up in there and it’s all good

matt nappo 1:03:56
bye man I thank you so much for for this time your great insight into asset cleansing and and and the trends in seating. It couldn’t have been a better program Brett, I thank you very much for this so much for being here. I was great. I wish you great success and please you know come back again sometime and let’s go through it again. Cuz

Brett Erickson 1:04:16
I would really I would really like that. I’ll take you up on that. This was a lot of fun. Thanks for having me.

matt nappo 1:04:20
Thanks. And bye for now and be well. Alright, yep, see it but Brett Erickson folks, issues with Andy podcast. If you’re so inclined, you can go up to Alaska and see him next week. Although I’m not really sure where you can find out about the rest of his days. The website as you heard in the beginning of the program is not updated enough. There has to be someplace maybe it’s Facebook page, maybe Twitter, I don’t know where you find out where he’s gonna be playing by you performing by you. But we’ll come up and try to try on your own. I do my best to keep you informed. I hope you enjoyed this program tomorrow. I don’t have a program April Burke was supposed to be with me tomorrow. She has some kind of medical emergency she needs to postpone. We’ll be back. Probably rescheduling for next week unless I do a solo show tomorrow. So I’ll be here alone. Until then. I’m Matt nappo for the mind doc TV podcast. Thanks for coming. Have a great night. Bye for now.

Transcribed by https://otter.ai

The Bee Man Cometh – Brendon Walsh – Host of The World Record Podcast

https://www.patreon.com/worldrecordpodcast

Brendon Walsh hosts the second funniest, and most mesmerizing podcast in the universe, The World Record Podcast, which can feature real celebrity guests, fake celebrity guests, prank calls and mayhem.

Bendon started performing stand-up comedy in Austin, Texas in 2002, He has appeared on The Price Is Right, Premium Blend, Jimmy Kimmel Live!, Conan, Last Comic Standing, in sketches on the G4 network, @midnight, and The Bob & Tom Show. He toured from 2005 to 2008 as the opening act for Doug Stanhope.

Walsh has performed at the Vancouver Comedy Festival; Just for Laughs in Montreal; South by Southwest (SXSW); the first annual Bentzen Ball in Washington, D.C.; the Fun Fun Fun Fest in Austin, Texas; the Bridgetown Comedy Festival in Portland, Oregon; and the Aspen Comedy Festival. In 2007, he won the $10,000 grand prize on the comedy stage at Famecast.com. In 2008, he was named one of the “Top Emerging Comedians” on AskMen.com.

On March 12, 2010, Walsh performed at A Night of 140 Tweets, a benefit for Haiti at the Upright Citizens Brigade Theatre in Los Angeles. In 2011, he appeared on WTF with Marc Maron and The Joe Rogan Experience. He previously co-hosted a podcast, The Bone Zone, with Randy Liedtke, and Do You Know Who Jason Segel Is? podcast with Nick Thune on the All Things Comedy network. He currently hosts The World Record Podcast, wherein each week he and a guest analyze a different world record. Guests have included Melissa Villaseñor, Josh Gad, Lin-Manuel Miranda, Christopher Nolan, Jared Fogle, Michael Keaton, Tom Brady and Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson. Ted Danson also appeared on the show to discuss his pursuit to break a bowling world record. In December 2020, he interviewed veteran celebrity traspo captain Dicker Troy.

Transcript:
Unknown Speaker 0:01
Everybody ready for the mind dog.

Minddog 0:25
And welcome my friends to yet another episode of the mind dog TV podcast. I’m Matt nappo. Thanks for coming. It’s great to have you here. As always, I know some people were expecting Rick Lee, the drummer from 10 years after today has been rescheduled to next Wednesday. I have a guest. I’m really excited about having on today actually more far more exciting. No, no offense directly. But I’m far more excited about the guests that I ended up having today. And I’m fortunate to have him here only because I stopped basically would not take no for an answer. He’s here today. And he’s got the best podcast that I’ve come across in a long time. Most interesting podcast, addictive and most unique, a podcast called the world class podcast. Ladies and gentlemen, please open your ears open your minds and help me welcome in the fabulously funny. Brendan Walsh wedding. Welcome. First order of business called the world record podcast will record what they call it world class podcast. It is a world class podcast it is. I have a problem with that. The brain is not connected often to the mouse. And as I mentioned it briefly before we got started. I’m a little nervous today because I wasn’t sure whether I was getting the B man or the stand up comic that Brendan Walsh is or George Washington scholar who makes me feel like I better be careful about the questions I asked. Well, the the Brendan Walsh the stand up comic is is dead. He’s now the big man. What happened was

Brendon Walsh 2:05
I Brendan Walsh was an investigative journalist on the side of being a stand up comedian, and I uncovered a plot by all the beekeepers to put mind control drugs in the honey in the honey supply. I uncovered that plot. And then one night, the beekeepers caught me snooping around their bee hives, and they all attacked me. They swarmed me. They held me down, they filled my mouth with bees. And then they sewed my mouth closed. And then the bees got into my system. And I became one with the bees. And now I’m the beam man. I’m don’t seem to be allergic to you. But I’ve tried to relate this story to my wife. And I’m glad you put it in words that I can actually play it back for it and concise, detailed events about what happened. So was that an assault or that was an assault? Basic run of the mill origin story to any superhero.

Minddog 3:07
So how has it affected your life? Being happy? It does it? Does it put any like changes on the way that you have to live your life.

Brendon Walsh 3:18
I just I have more powers I have the powers of the bees, I can summon bees. And I wouldn’t say I’m half and half. I mean, it’s just kind of intertwined. It’s like, way when Jeff Goldblum became the fly most very cool stuff. Like it’s all it’s all mixed into my system. A little scary. So the beam man now is, as I mentioned, is the moderator of the host of and the facilitator, I guess, of the world record podcast and I apologize for getting that wrong. The most, the most unusual podcast ever. And I have to tell you, I came in here one night to work on editing my podcast. And four hours later when my wife said, What are you doing? I said I got to start working on my podcast. She said he came in in four hours. I said I started watching this thing. And I went from one episode to another I can’t take my eyes off it it’s like fucking era when Oh,

Unknown Speaker 4:17
that’s that’s really good to hear. I’m glad to hear it. I’m glad to hear that you were watching it too because we started doing

Unknown Speaker 4:24
started doing video about

Unknown Speaker 4:27
maybe about 30 episodes ago. I’m not sure which episode we started with just you know, audio where I like, I like audio episodes I grew up listening to like Bob and Doug McKenzie and Cheech and Chong like all those old comedy albums like sketch comedy albums. And

Unknown Speaker 4:48
I always I, there’s just something about that, that I like because it’s not you know, it’s leaves a lot up to you to, to, you know, put together what these guys look like, and what’s going on and paint your own.

Unknown Speaker 5:00
scenario. And when we started the podcast because I had two podcasts before the world record podcast, I had the bone zone podcast. And do you know Jason Segel is they’re both just audio, and then starting this one, I was like, you know, I want to get more serious, you know, like, let’s, you know, that’s really a while serious, but I mean, you know, I guess my point is, like, you know, this isn’t going to just be a hobby, because we did the bone zone for six years. And there was no income ever really generated from that, even though it’s the funniest podcast that was ever made.

Unknown Speaker 5:38
So with this one, I’m like, let’s, you know, let’s really, let’s, let’s do this one, right? And everybody was saying, you need to everybody does video, you have to do video now. And I’m like, you know, our podcast isn’t just, you know, three comedians sitting around a table, telling road stories or whatever. So if I’m going to do video, I want to do something that lends its I want that to be another layer of the podcast. So absolutely. I get that. But it seems like it’s a lot of work in post or to get all the effects that you have for the video stuff, and makes it a much bigger job than doing just an audio podcast. Yeah. Yeah, it really does. I’ve been thinking about because also, I still don’t think, you know,

Unknown Speaker 6:25
I think the majority of the people are still just listening to it. Which is fine. I mean, that’s that’s how it was made. But I I’m into the video stuff we’re doing, I found a great, there’s a guy named drew Brown, who is a listener, like I kind of put a call out on discord or on the Patreon or something if anybody wants to help with editing and then he stepped up and he does, you know, right off the bat just doing started doing a great job. So Oh, good for him. And good for you. I’m Oh, by the way, the Patreon link is in the scroll there, it’s going across the bottom of the screen. It’s patreon.com slash world record podcast, I really urge you to support this thing, folks. And if you haven’t checked it out, please check it out. Now you do it’s weird, because you’re doing a premiere that seems like it’s live. Is that Monday nights is that when when you’re doing it, or is it every Monday night. I mean, that’s, that’s a new thing I just note because like I’ll upload to the way the you know, the episodes go we generally record about an hour and a half to two hours. And then I’ll put in you know, the way Patreon works, I put about half of it out for free and then the other if you want the other 90 minute or whatever, 40 minutes, whatever, it’s on the Patreon so with with the free videos, I put them up on YouTube. And I just noticed when I was

Unknown Speaker 7:50
uploading them, there’s an option to set as a premiere. And so I just like did that one night as a goof and was just kind of promoting it like whoa, big premiere live chat blah. And so, so I did it that night and it was kind of fun. And so I’m just like that’s just kind of another stupid layer of like the podcast to just have this like kind of pointless premiere of your free video.

Unknown Speaker 8:21
But it was fun to be part of the chat room and just

Unknown Speaker 8:26
but to see you there chatting chatting along. It’s like it’s can’t be live because he’s here answering questions. Yeah. Yeah, it’s kind of confusing. Yeah. might as well do it if they’re giving you the option to do I just don’t I guess other people do that. I don’t know. I don’t know what the point of the premiere is why premiere is is is not my thing. But I have pre taped interviews and then done the live thing through here played that video back through here with the live thing going in the corner and people advocate it was live and just watched it along with them and just kind of chuckled to myself with people thinking this is live and they’re trying to ask questions of the guests.

Unknown Speaker 9:06
There’s no way I could possibly do it because it happened last week. But yeah, remember there was a Mr. Show sketch. I assume you’re familiar you watched Mr. Show.

Unknown Speaker 9:17
There was a Mr. Show sketch for David Cross was doing a call in show like a live call in show where people would call into answer questions about a topic but it was the topic was pre taped. So everything everybody was calling in for he’s like that was last week. This week we’re talking about I forget exactly the dynamics of it, but it was one of those it’s such a funny sketch because it’s such a dumb idea. Right. But on the audio side now people are not going to get the fact that Tom Brady’s Tom Brady is wearing a helmet throughout the whole thing you have ever have to stop and say we need to describe this to the listeners because like

Unknown Speaker 10:00
You I have most of my listeners, most of my audience is on the listening side. I do the live stream just to kind of keep people engaged and stuff. But the numbers are minimal compared to that. So yeah, I have to always remind myself, I’m really doing this for the audio people. So I need to remind people of what, and explain to people what they’re looking at. Do you have that? Uh, you know, I feel like more recently we’ve been because now I feel like the what we’re doing is more geared like we’re starting to gear it more towards that, assuming everybody’s watching it, you know, like, not so much visual but there there are kind of a lot of visual gags that are Oh tensional and, and then with the editing, the stuff drew puts in there is you know, definitely adds another comedic element visually. But, uh, no, I always forget to you know, like the Tom Brady. I don’t know if I told any wearing helmets all times. I know. So if you only heard it on, on the audio podcast, you need to go check out the video now and see what you’re missing. That’s that’s my point there. I’ll also be on the Patreon too. He shows he shows his penis at the end of the of the end at the end of the episode. Oh, I just joined Patreon this morning. I’m gonna have to go check that out. Very at the very end of the night like I’m hungry to see Tom Brady’s penis, but it’s it’s naturally curious. I am a little curious about it. Because now that you’ve said also, you’ve gotten some great guests and with veal. You know, obviously, before Brendan died when he was doing stand up you always knew it was humor. NET sometimes we’re on the podcast stuff your old podcast, the current podcast I taught to tell when you’re kidding and when you’re when you’re trying to be funny or you just are being funny or just really being serious and you get me sometimes

Unknown Speaker 11:58
with the Cooper Minh tire guy was the first time I saw you almost break character and crack a smile at what was going on and kind of hit that there were some humor there. Sometimes you you just take the call so seriously. The man is is locked in the zone here with asking these questions. It’s just it’s it’s remarkable see you don’t break character and laugh tough there was a I lost it recently. Oh, when man the a train Amanda and her backstory is that she was carrying a bunch of batteries. She’s the a train she has the speed of the trains. And she was carrying a bunch of batteries across the train tracks and then got hit by a train and she got fused with the batteries. And now she has the speed of a train. But we were calling New York pizza places

Unknown Speaker 12:55
just acting like it just saying we need a slice of that New York pizza.

Unknown Speaker 13:00
And

Unknown Speaker 13:02
and I said then I told him we call one place and I said I’m gonna get I was like you need to deliver it to the top of the Empire State Building I’m going to eat that New York pizza

Unknown Speaker 13:12
and I’m gonna diary off the side of the Empire State Building off the top of the Empire State Building. And then the a train said you know, you have to be careful because if you do diarrhea from the top of the Empire State Building it builds up so much velocity that it could kill somebody on the street when they’re walking by and that I couldn’t contain my you that made me laugh really hard. Superman tires thing.

Unknown Speaker 13:38
I actually just designed a T shirt for Cooperman tires that I’m going to start selling

Unknown Speaker 13:44
but the when we called the the and I can send you a clip. I don’t know if you play clips but I have a short clip of that call.

Unknown Speaker 13:53
We call the tire place. Lizzie Cooperman was our guest and I just randomly introducing her one time because she’s been on the podcast a handful times she’s a great guest we just like have a lot of fun with her. And I just I introduced her I said

Unknown Speaker 14:09
CEO or the heiress of the Cooper my entire fortune

Unknown Speaker 14:13
and just Cooperman tire just sounded like it sounds like a real thing right and so we just kind of stuck with that ever since I you know made her the errors and CEO of Cooper tires now Now we so we call the tire place and she said that they have a new line of fruit roll up tires. tires that are made of like fruit roll up material I guess we call the place seeing if they could

Unknown Speaker 14:40
if they if they got the shipment of fruit roll up tires and and the guys like I don’t know what you’re talking about. We know we don’t have flavored tires here. We just have regular tires. And Lizzy said Oh no, I think it might be because we sent them prove tires and I said oh is that what it is? Did you get pruned tires and there was a

Unknown Speaker 15:00
New incidents? And the guy said due to incident that’s what I’m most laugh because I did not expect the guy say, I don’t know what what are you talking about due to incident? There was no who did I don’t know what you’re talking about we don’t have tires and lug doodoo.

Unknown Speaker 15:16
He said, I mean, that’s one of my favorite calls. I mean, granted it’s it’s very recent but it I mean to have somebody say do to get them to repeat a new incident or do it wasn’t doing similar do do it was to do it today. Yeah, there were two terms that I was using. But either way Yeah, to get him to say just do repeat do two, four or five times, right? Like I mean, that’s just like a gold star in the crank call.

Unknown Speaker 15:47
handbook. It did you do a lot of crank clothes as a kid because you seem to have the knack for most people in your situation doing that, at some point with like, wow, this person is so stupid. I don’t know where to go from here or just lose, lose the ability to keep them on the line, you have an uncanny ability to keep some of those people on 1415 minutes where I know if I tried that they would be bailing in 30 or 45 seconds. Yeah. Is that a skill you learned as a kid? Did you? Were you trained in that self train? Well, I mean, you know, like any kid around, you know, anybody around my age? I feel like maybe within 10 years of

Unknown Speaker 16:32
I don’t know, crap, making prank calls was just a thing that you did as a as a kid, you know? especially before even caller ID or when caller ID came out that kind of put the Yeah, I probably stopped a lot of people from making prank calls. And

Unknown Speaker 16:49
now with cell phones, I mean, you can’t you can’t you’re limited to businesses because nobody answers a strange number.

Unknown Speaker 16:56
But yeah, I’ve been doing it my whole life, I guess. I mean, I’ve just always had I always liked that stuff. You know, like the jerky boys. When I was introduced to the jerky boys, I was just like, this is next level. And that was even this is how old I am, is that I was working. I was probably like, I don’t know, 19 or something. And I had a job as a security guard, like an overnight security guard at this place at this, uh, this building in Philadelphia. And one of the guys that I worked with one of the other security guards who worked upstairs came in and he had a cassette tape. And he’s like, dude, have you ever heard of the jerky boys? I was like, no. And he gave it to me. And this was like the bootleg before the jerky boys had like a record deal. And before the internet, like things would just kind of spread people would make copies of the tapes. That’s the same thing with the south part. That Jesus versus Santa as like a Christmas card to I don’t know, they made that and it just kind of got passed around. And then you know, and then it becomes a real thing. But I got the jerky boys, bootleg. And then you know, all there, they have more albums than people realize, too. And they’re just they’re so funny. It’s some of them are dated. There’s one I was playing for Amanda, we’re on a road trip. And she had never really heard the jerky boys. were listening all the time. And really, you know, great stuff. But there were a couple where you’re like, oh, man, this is so like, there’s one where, like, it’s so even before 911 you know, like it’s like a few years before 911 and a guy called one of them because it was the guy Johnny Brennan. And then I forget the other guy’s name, but he was like, Middle Eastern or Indian or something. And he would always do like a call like this. And he calls he calls it a bomb threat to a pizza place. He’s like, I bomb you. I blow you up and it’s just like, oh my god that like that just shows you what a different world we’re living in. I mean, not that it’s acceptable to do that ever but

Unknown Speaker 19:03
on like a published like that wasn’t a bootleg that was like released by Capitol Records or whatever.

Unknown Speaker 19:09
On like jerky boys three or four. They had more albums than you remember. I actually did something very similar way before jerky boys existed. I was working in a gas station during the midnight shift. You know, one of those, you know, you just stay in the booth and people give you their money, that type of thing. And so guys came up friends of mine, that we smoked them joint and they went over to jack in a box across the street and to get some food and I saw them waiting on line. I said Man, this is a long time. So I called the jack in the box and I said listen, there’s two men at the counter. One of them has a hand grenade. The other one is got a machine gun. And don’t don’t feed these men. They are very dangerous men. So they were standing there on one like 45 minutes. All of a sudden I saw cops coming into the parking lot getting on the roof and the whole bit cops get behind my friends and they’re standing right behind them online and all of a sudden you see them throwing them against the wall.

Unknown Speaker 20:02
And then they got him interrogating them. And they asked him, Do you know anybody who might want to set you up like this? And they didn’t see me across the street like, laughing.

Unknown Speaker 20:12
They did not rat me out, but I didn’t know. And this is like 1979 or something. My friend, my friend had a half and a half pound of weed stuck in the back of his jacket. The cops found it. And they were but they couldn’t do anything about it because he was a victim. Not not. It was an illegal stretching, set up and

Unknown Speaker 20:31
a half pound of weed like wow, yeah, that’s an awful, awful, awful thing you did.

Unknown Speaker 20:38
I know. I was. I was kidding. There’s a long time. I don’t think I’m still on the hook for that. 1979 but I was not.

Unknown Speaker 20:47
I wasn’t good with the prank call for prank phone calls. Like you wouldn’t be able to hold them up online. I don’t you know, it’s kind of shifted to with the crank calls that we’re doing are like,

Unknown Speaker 21:01
I feel like they’re getting less. I mean, not less jokey. I mean, I still think they’re I feel like they’re a lot of them geared towards just like, interesting, where it’s almost like a social, like kind of just finding out like that. There’s just people that are completely different than you are especially like, not to sound like a fogy. But, you know, like young young people, like people that are like 20 not even that young. 30s didn’t know how David Letterman was. And I was like, how can you be 30 years old and not know David Letterman? I mean, that’s true. I, but you know, everybody’s Do you have to?

Unknown Speaker 21:41
You know, I mean, that’s just like, if that’s not the world you grew, you know, like the guy I think was in Florida, worked at a pet store had sounded like he had kind of a rural upbringing. Like if his folks weren’t watching David Letterman. And he doesn’t have like a bent you know, if he’s not like interested in comedy outside of, I don’t know, the hangover or whatever, then I don’t know. Like, I feel like I can. It’s easy to just jump to like, Oh my god, you idiot, but it’s like,

Unknown Speaker 22:14
Yeah, I don’t know. I can cut people some slack sometimes, but it is baffling. Like, like, cuz that guy like didn’t know anything. Right? Everything I threw at him. He’s like, Nope, never heard of that. No, no.

Unknown Speaker 22:29
Like, I don’t remember specifics, but like he didn’t know David Letterman was he didn’t know Jimmy Fallon was. Yeah, Jimmy Fallon. Right. How can you be 30 in that? No, Fallon?

Unknown Speaker 22:40
I don’t know. Yeah, I bet he knows who the Kardashians are, though. You know, I’m the opposite. You can hit me with anything. You know, that’s really current. And I wouldn’t know it cuz i don’t i took television out of my house, like 12 years ago. So I feel like here’s but with like the Kardashians and shit like that. You have to go. You still have to buy food. So you have to go to the grocery store. And every fuckin like the Kardashians are just like a trillion dollar industry or something like they have. They must. I would love to get behind the scenes of like, what makes that fucking awful, awful machine. oiled and still going for more than a decade? Because every time you go to a grocery store, I you know, see for yourself. There’s at least three magazine covers with a Kardashian or a big Kardashian. You know, if it’s not a photograph of one of them. There’s a big bowl by Kardashian brought a ferret or something or like Courtney’s weight loss secrets or, and it’s like how many people you know like, how many millions of dollars are they spending on like these weird fucking PR firms? Are you because you know, there’s a there’s somebody who’s just like, on top of Like Us Weekly where they’re like you Okay, what’s the Kardashian? We gotta have a Kardashian. We don’t get a Kardashian on the cover, then you don’t get the fucking Ryan Seacrest story. Like there’s got to be just like a couple companies that control that are like the spicket of bullshit fucking gossip, that then they just like work with these awful magazines. And they’re just like, Listen, okay, we’ll give you a fucking Blake Shelton story, but you’ve got to run this fucking Miley Cyrus. It’s just it’s just awful. Awful that it’s like because you can’t really escape it like you go to the grocery store. And you’re gonna you got to stand in line at the grocery store. That you don’t really I go to the the self checkout No matter how much I have just to point out there’s there’s still like the mat. They still have like the gum and candy like they have that impulse buy shit and

Unknown Speaker 24:53
yeah, and there’s a famous now for 20 years or more for having absolutely no talent or

Unknown Speaker 25:00
not adding anything to humanity, no value to the world. It’s genius. honest, it’s kind of genius because it all just started from a sex tape from Kim Kardashian. Like, blowing a guy. Like a rapper, AJ.

Unknown Speaker 25:17
And she was like getting boned and sucking and fucking and.

Unknown Speaker 25:22
And that got leaked out. Maybe by them or maybe I mean, it’s definitely turning, you know, lemons into lemonade. I mean,

Unknown Speaker 25:31
yeah, I don’t know. But that’s really that’s what it’s all about. I mean, the timeline, the chronological. I mean, the her father also, you know, defended OJ Simpson and was friends with oj, I remember that very well. Yeah. And then but then the second coming was like her blowing a guy and then all of a sudden, a billion dollar a year, multi billion dollar a year industry because like, they all kind of have their own bullshit that people are buying into, which is fine. doesn’t take any money out of my pocket. I mean, I think it’s just, it’s just shows how vapid a lot of people are. Absolutely. And you know what, we went through a period between 2000 to 2010, where every I think you’re right about the idea of leaking it yourself. Every celebrity or every girl celebrity young girl celebrity was trying to was caught with a blowjob tape, or purposely put out the blowjob tape making it seem like somebody else had done it surreptitiously. But it was a way to get more attention on them, you know, inside the blow job paperwork. thing of 2000.

Unknown Speaker 26:36
That’s a good, that’s a good alias to sign into a hotel under BJ tapes.

Unknown Speaker 26:43
Yeah, like Paris Hilton had one after that. And I wonder if that was like, if she’s like, Hey, I’m fucking pointless to but I can, like, you know, because it’s just like, Oh, I have even I’m equally as untalented and pointless as this Kardashian. Or, I can do the same thing and maybe get more money even though my parents are like, you know, already super wealthy because my great grandfather started a fucking hotel chain. Right. Yeah, I think that that was definitely the case with her. I mean, it was anything for attention. And, you know, she was trying to do everything, record albums, and whatever. And but, you know, famous is a strange thing. Some people just want to be famous. I had a kid on the show who that was his whole quest. And he mainly went as far as like, making, trying to capitalize on a gay bashing attack that happened to him, who came on the show, basically wanting to tell a story about that. And then he opened up with a big blazer and tattoo on his chest and said, Avenue entertainer and said, I started by saying, I gotta get on Elon, that’s like, what the fuck does that have to do with getting attacked? I mean, so you using me? and telling the story just to be famous? It’s just like, well, that’s, that’s, that’s kind of become, yeah, there’s a whole generation of people that because of the Kardashians, and because of reality television, that’s like, if you ask a lot of I bet if you asked a lot of high school kids what they want to be, and I don’t I don’t want to diminish the whole I’m sure there’s still like some smart kid, you know, whatever. It’s not a whole generation. But majority. There’s a lot of dumb asses. Where if you ask them, what they want to do what’s what are the what’s their goal? It would be just to be like, I don’t know, to be famous. Like, I just want to walk into the club, and have everybody turn their heads and know I’m here and it’s like, what do you want to be famous for? I don’t care. Like, I don’t know, rap or acting or, or just like, you know, just being me, you know, doing me. And that’s just like a real

Unknown Speaker 28:44
it’s just a real dumbing down of, I mean, I feel like this whole country has been intentionally dumbed down no question about it. Absolutely. He’s maybe I’m trying to, it’s hard to pinpoint exactly, but I think it’s probably somewhere in the 80s

Unknown Speaker 29:03
like even even down to like the

Unknown Speaker 29:07
you know, like the the like like the Bill Murray movies and stuff like the like where the hero was a total schlub loser who like Didn’t you know, didn’t want to exercise didn’t want to work that and it’s like getting a bunch of kids to idolize these like slackers maybe? Yeah, part of like a larger conspiracy of like, just have everybody just want to fuckin you know, party. Do beerbongs be like a Hawaiian shirt, dopey guy.

Unknown Speaker 29:37
party animal. Nair do well. And then another big thing I’ve been I’ve been talking about this with people lately because it’s just dawned on me. But like how is because this is also affected. We’re at a point now, where there’s a whole generation for the past 20 years where pornography has been

Unknown Speaker 30:00
plentiful and free. And an easy is easy to access as making a telephone call. And I find that to be very, very curious because the government can regulate anything they fuckin one. They can write a and it’s like, oh, the internet’s a new Oh, two new thing they didn’t know what to do. It’s like bullshit. Because that could have been the top story on every channel is like, okay, we have this new thing, the internet. There’s a lot of pornography. How do we figure this out? And it would have been very easy to put laws in place where you can just like, just have if you want to watch pornography, you have to put in a credit card number, and we’ll charge you one penny. We just need to. We just need proof. The only way you can’t just click and say yes, I’m a teen, there has to be a way for us to prove that you’re not eight years old about to watch an anal cream pie gang.

Unknown Speaker 31:04
Also, another thing with this plenty full free, readily available pornography. Things have been none of this shit existed 20 years ago, there was never such a thing as an angel cream pie, gaping to khaki gang bang, caulk gagging whoever, like there’s things that have been invented and like and like abusive, kind of like, you know, spinning in your faces slapping each at like, it’s like, This is all because everybody, you know, back back when we would have like a porno tape that was stashed away. And you get a chance or the inkling you get like a little warning or like, you know what I’m going to watch. I’m going to cue up my favorite part of that porno. Rub one out and my day, right now. It’s, uh,

Unknown Speaker 31:58
you know, it’s just regular meat and potatoes like you see, like, Oh, she’s an attractive lady. He’s an attractive man. Oh, look, they’re made. They’re having sex. I see everything graphically. You weren’t like, okay, I’ve seen enough of that. Can he try to stick his foot up her?

Unknown Speaker 32:16
acid right, like, for

Unknown Speaker 32:20
like, I mean, you just go on any like porno site, and they have all the categories. There’s there’s no world and hey, I’m not if you’re into pis, that’s fine. Like if you’re into getting peed on, whatever that’s that’s been around for a while, you know, like kinks had been around. But there should not be 750,000 pistes videos available on corn hub or whatever, whatever site and I feel like that has damaged because like what’s an easier society to take over? Like you feed them processed food for 30 years? give them free pornography. You got a bunch of fat people jacking off?

Unknown Speaker 33:03
What’s an easier country to just to conquer? Yeah, yeah, I get that. And you’re absolutely right. I mean, ain’t no cream price. A gang bags did that not exist in my day, we had stag films that your uncle captain, you had to kind of figure out how to get the screws off of the hinges so you could watch it. But I think they run out of things to shock people. But I had an 18 year old freshman college student comedian, just beginning comedian right before COVID hit. He did his first couple of stand up gigs. Beautiful bit about the night they turned off the dorm. turned off the pornography. He said just the audible scream what you could hear from a mile away. And then we ran out into the hall and every guy that is sticking his pants

Unknown Speaker 33:51
sticking around. They turned it off. So like they blocked porno sites on the on the Wi Fi. Yeah. But they don’t know I’m not a you know, I’m not approved by any means. But I just you know, like I said it’s something and yet 20 years later, I mean, I had bits about that about how like, things are being invented and like CoQ gagging is like it’s like why are you trying to do that? She’s a nice lady. Why are you doing that? You’re already down there giving you a Billy Joel. Why are you trying to murder her? That’s one of my bits. Yeah, that’s a mosh pit to be man has new deuterium. Oh, yeah. Well, one of your old bits. I Brendan’s old bits from 2012. I saw recently and I thought wow, how far behind New York is because you were talking about getting your medical marijuana card. I just got mine. That was 2011 2012 or something. I just got mine two months ago. And a month later, they made it legal in New York and I called up my friend I said, they made it legal in New York. He said you know what this means? I said, Yeah, it means I wasted fucking money on a medical marijuana card. That’s what it means. But what is that right?

Unknown Speaker 35:00
Do you like 50 bucks or something? Oh no yeah doctor visit was 145 and then another 75 or 80 for the card and then you have to renew it but I’m not gonna renew it now but well they had that out here with I mean now it’s you don’t need anything you can just go to a dispensary

Unknown Speaker 35:16
but even when it was the medical marijuana cards there were just these, you know, store shop places you’d walk into, they’d say, what’s wrong with you? You’d be like I’m scared of everything. Okay.

Unknown Speaker 35:29
That’s what it was like for me with the doctor was a zoom call and she said, What’s the matter? I said, I got chronic pain. Okay. Yeah. Yeah, so it’s still that way. And but it’s a matter of money. But it’s another thing you know, like the government Well, whatever. I’m not trying to get on a big my hair’s like doing like a like, what it is Yeah, mine is

Unknown Speaker 35:53
but just the the you know, the fact that marijuana has been illegal this whole time. And like cigarettes and alcohol, which are proven to just be fucking awful for you not to get into a whole conspiratorial thing but I’m just like, you know, the government like there are kind of vast conspiracies like you know, when people talk about like anything like 911 it’s like oh, that’s impossible. Nobody would do that. It’s like look at fucking do some research see what governments have done throughout history nothing’s fucking impossible. You know that just be that dismissive.

Unknown Speaker 36:30
Just watch the Godfather if history has taught us anything, it that you can kill anybody?

Unknown Speaker 36:36
Yeah, totally. And it’s usually is like the the first person like yeah, watch a, you know, Forensic Files. It’s like, yeah, it was the wife or the husband. It’s whoever benefits you know, and then that works on grander scales, like governments and

Unknown Speaker 36:53
you know, and corporate you know, corporations and governments like can collude and do things to fuck everybody over people do that, you know? Every day Yeah, guys right now figuring out a way how to screw their friend out of $100 Yeah, why do you think the further up you get there are people like that? Well, it’s just that it’s really hard to keep a secret and the bigger something gets the more people get involved the more likely is somebody is going to come out and spill the beans somewhere along the line that’s that’s my whole take on some of the big conspiracy theories. I got to get your take on this because everybody’s fleeing la all comedians are fleeing LA and going to Austin you started in less than a year out in LA. What is your take on this whole mass migration of funny people out to Austin? I mean, you know, it’s honestly it’s it’s funny we were talking about you know, last year, probably last year around April of last year when the all this because it’s been insane here in Los Angeles with just like,

Unknown Speaker 37:59
you know, businesses going under like the lockdowns and it’s been it’s been over the top and and work to and the cost of living so I was talking with

Unknown Speaker 38:13
with the a train about like, maybe we should move to Austin you know, cuz I was like, we need to get out of here. I can’t fucking take this anymore.

Unknown Speaker 38:23
And I couldn’t I’d like to move to the to the Pacific Northwest. But either way, Austin I’m like, I know Austin. I love Austin still when we look on Zillow for places to rent I know exactly where they are and

Unknown Speaker 38:37
and then about you know, five months later Joe Rogan out there and and that’s that’s really the you know, that’s that’s why it’s Joe Rogan is is the most powerful person in he’s the most powerful comedian he’s he’s a cult leader in history in history. Yeah. in history in the sense that like he could and I’m I I’m friends with Joe I’m not you know,

Unknown Speaker 39:07
I’m not as entrenched in like the, you know, that whole scene click. When I mean, I’m friends. I’m friendly with all those guys. And, and Joe, I did you know, I toured with Joe a little bit a while back. And so I’m, you know, I’m not saying this with any kind of, no, I mean, it’s a but because it is kind of but Joe’s like a cult leader. I mean, he is like, the power that he has to

Unknown Speaker 39:35
like people do because there were guys like Sam Kinison, right he used to tour around with a group of guys called like the outlaws of comedy. And then when Sam died like, you know, some of these guys their careers went on but they went from you know, doing like these arena shows to back at like these, you know, clubs, small clubs, and granted they wouldn’t keep doing arena shows, but Joe’s path

Unknown Speaker 40:00
Is that like he can, he could get, he could pick a random person off the street, have them on his podcast, and then say go see this person do comedy. They’ve never done comedy before. But they’re going to be at the Paramount Theatre in Austin, Friday and Saturday go see them, those shows will sell out. Just because Joe said, Go see this person, they’re gonna try comedy for the milk, no doubt about he made 30 million sales on a book that kind of suck because he said it was a good book. I mean, and not not to take away from the author who wrote the book, I thought it sucked that put it that way could still be subjective. But his power and influence isn’t astonishing, considering where it started, because I looked at some of his first podcast episodes, and there’s no way and you would think in nine years, 10 years down the road, this is going to be the most influential person on the planet as far as getting being able to sell merchandise, sell a new comedian, sell a new musician, whatever. I know, people who’ve gotten into bands, like the black keys, just because Joe had him on on his podcast, and that’s like, it’s, it’s amazing. And that’s like, yeah, that’s my only

Unknown Speaker 41:13
idea. Just,

Unknown Speaker 41:15
it’s Yeah, it’s really incredible to see that kind of power. And I think it’s like, I get you know, like, I’ve never talked to Joe about it, but that it’s probably I mean, he’s very healthy and like, you know, the amount that he exercises and stuff. I mean, I think he needs to do that to keep his head screwed on straight. I mean, the the weed smoking. I mean, I think if I achieved that level, I it would be hard to keep it together mentally, you know, totally, totally. I you know, you’d start I mean, I don’t know I you know, be that’s it. That’s a different that’s a level where, like, people are taking notes. Like, you know, the government knows about Joe Rogan. And they’re watching Joe Rogan, and I, you know, I’m sure I don’t know if he’s ever gotten a call. And I know, I’m sounding like Alex Jones, but, I mean, I’m sure there aren’t like, you know,

Unknown Speaker 42:08
there are things that maybe you would that I mean, if I were him, I would be like maybe I shouldn’t really delve too deep into this thing that we’re you know, I don’t know like an Epstein thing or I can’t even think of an example but

Unknown Speaker 42:25
I want to know knocking on my door. Or it gets some weird No, you know, saying like, Hey, you better candidate on the fuckin Epstein shit if you know what’s good for you.

Unknown Speaker 42:36
But I don’t know. I mean, he’s I don’t I don’t listen to his show that much.

Unknown Speaker 42:42
So I don’t know. I mean, I feel like he he gets into conspiracy stuff. And he’s not afraid to talk about anything. So I think most his friends like Eddie Bravo will come on and talk conspiracy stuff. He generally is the voice of reason in that room and I don’t listen that much anymore. He that there was a time when I listened like every day when I was traveling, commuting. I don’t commute anymore. So there’s no no reason to. But it’s funny that you say mentioned called and it’s because I had done a video on the cult of Dan, Doug Stan hope and basically thing saying that his influence over the killer termites was very cult like and the killer termites loved it. They I mean, they they were like, Yeah, he right on you got you hit it, right. I think, you know, sometimes, you know, influence can be a dangerous thing. But and sometimes, you know, people can just latch on to that and be proud to wear that. You know, I would think if you said I was in a cult, I would be a little insulted. But I always expected to kind of have to defend myself. Nobody. Nobody got angry at me. They’ll say yeah, that’s pretty. Pretty, right? It is like a church like a cult. Religion. But the thing about stand up I said for a guy who, who is totally anti religion and most of his materials against different religions. It kind of is a religion. Right?

Unknown Speaker 44:01
It kind of changes the ballgame in some some respects. Yeah, but enough that those guys they don’t need us talking about them. Well, me. Yeah. Let’s talk about you. Let me bring that back in. Where is that? Oh, well, record podcast, the most unusual a different type of video podcast, vlog vodcast if you want to call it you’ll ever find

Unknown Speaker 44:28
it you have to see it. It’s beyond explanation. But I have to warn you this you cannot just watch one episode your wife will have to or your significant other will have to come in and drag you out and say get the wife in on it. You know, my pregnant I’m still trying to explain to her the whole baby thing and I don’t I don’t do it very articulately. And

Unknown Speaker 44:51
she’s just looks at me like

Unknown Speaker 44:55
I had my mouth filled with bees. So to close them out. The bees got into my system and now I’m wondering

Unknown Speaker 45:00
The BS. She said, Does he really believe that? Yeah, I said, You know, I can’t tell when he’s kidding. And when he’s not. I know you have to go. you’re short on time, but I do have to kind of get get some clarity on. You and I have something in common. I think I’ve got bad banned from Twitter more than you did. You got you got banned from Twitter for

Unknown Speaker 45:27
pretending to be Donald Trump Jr. But not really pretending that you made it pretty obvious that you weren’t him, right? No, it was pretty. It’s pretty confusing. And I have to give a shout out to jomar neighbors who’s a another super funny comedian who’s legitimately crazy. I love jemar and jemar. On Twitter, he he did this first like one night I was scrolling through Twitter.

Unknown Speaker 45:53
And he changed his profile to be Donald Trump and changed you know, if you have a

Unknown Speaker 45:59
What do they call it with the check? idea. So if you have a verified account, you can change you know, your handles still the same, but you could change the banner, the photo and then the name. So he copied everything from Donald Trump’s Twitter page. And and the only thing that would tip you off it said at Jamar neighbors but that’s in small like you don’t barely see that. And it’s verified. So I was scrolling through Twitter and I came across like a tweet from Donald Trump Jr. That just said like, something completed just said, like y’all are gay or something like that. And I was like, What the fuck? And it took me you know, took me a couple seconds I go, Oh, shit, that’s jamara That’s hilarious. So

Unknown Speaker 46:45
another night or either way, you know, I messaged him was like, dude, that’s the funniest shit I’ve ever seen. And then he would always he would impersonate different celebrities change his whole page, and just tweet this crazy shit. And one night we were but I was up late, scrolling through, and he’s acting like Donald Trump again. So I changed, like Mike Pence. And we’re get it you know, we’re just having these insane conversations on Twitter. And it really at first glance, it really looks like Donald Trump and Mike Pence, they’re saying these things. And so then on the day, that and then and then we change our things back and nothing ever happened. But then the day that they whatever day that it’s on my new Twitter account.

Unknown Speaker 47:31
Like November, whatever day they called the election when they said Joe Biden’s the winner. I was like, Oh, you know, it’d be funny. I’ll just change my profile to Donald Trump Jr. For a few minutes and do some tweets. And I just was like, you know, this is bullshit. Me and Eric are putting out a pot of coffee and we’re gonna figure this thing out. The Trump Organization is the wheels are in motion for the Trump Organization to buy the White House So good luck getting in there sleepy Joe. I literally did like five tweets or something. And people you know, the replies were everybody you know, everybody was kind of in a frenzy at that point. like yeah, we won or like fuck this shit and and

Unknown Speaker 48:10
literally did it for about 10 minutes and then I was like, okay, that’s I’m gonna go change my change it back to my own profile and and then it said, your account is suspended and

Unknown Speaker 48:21
and they won’t give it back. They tried.

Unknown Speaker 48:25
But this stupid in some way. I mean, I’ve been stupid and I gave him credit for because when I got in, this happened to me a couple of times. Now I’ll confess I’ve been bad. But when I had to go to great lengths to try to not let them know that it was me starting a new account again, you’re new and I don’t know if I should even say this, but your new account doesn’t go far to hide who you really are, and they can’t figure it out. That’s my new account. Well, you know, you just you need a whole new email address. I mean, and that’s kind of getting my Twitter account taken away from me with that Donald Trump shit was

Unknown Speaker 49:01
one of the worst moves that I’ve made like not that my life revolves around Twitter, but you know, I had about 80,000 followers verified account which does make a difference when it comes to like promoting things like it’s you’re elevated in the feed and you know, again with this with the world record podcast, my only real

Unknown Speaker 49:24
promotional tools are Twitter and Instagram and and it really kind of like neutered me that Twitter it’s like nobody seeing any of the you know, I have like six 7005 don’t even know what I have.

Unknown Speaker 49:39
But a fraction of that and I doubt they’ll verify me again. So like it’s ruin that, you know, that promotional tool and another side effect was I had a great thing going for about 10 years. I had a family on Twitter Trish and Trevor Walsh and and we would get in these fights it next week.

Unknown Speaker 50:00
Trish while she lived in Philly, hated me. And I was behind on my child support. And then Trevor was like this little psycho. And I would get in these fights with them. And, you know, it was a fun, great thing. And a lot of people didn’t know, like I had people who should know better. Back when I started, where they’re like, do you have an ex wife and a kid in Philly?

Unknown Speaker 50:19
And now people don’t know when you’re getting even your friends? Don’t I’ve put this to the test. But how well Yeah, no. And I discovered that to that again, until it wasn’t until my

Unknown Speaker 50:32
well trician Trevor, all my side accounts that I would have fun with all got caught, I guess they just looked at the IP address they came from or something, but they managed to just shut down all the fun that I was having. And

Unknown Speaker 50:47
the

Unknown Speaker 50:50
I forget what I was gonna say, You’ve lost your family. I mean, basically, they took that away from you. And I and I, the the the other thing about not knowing when I’m joking, is I just don’t you know, Twitter. I don’t I don’t take anything that seriously. I mean, I take things seriously, you know, I have kids, and you know, I’m not a total whack job. But as far as Twitter, I’m like, I’m a fucking comedian. This is a platform like, you know, be all about whatever social, you know, any social stuff. Go ahead and tweet about whatever, you know, you want to tweet about. And I but I feel like everybody else is picking up the slack on that. Like, I don’t need to broadcast that. Like, yes, I’m on the right side of history with everything because I’m a rational guy. But I assume people know that about me and they don’t and I tweet these insane things like on my old account, like one good thing about the account being shut down. I’m like, Oh, well, now. It’s gonna be you know, people are gonna dig up something from 2009 rice. It’s something wildly inappropriate. Just because it was more acceptable to say something out like completely outrageous.

Unknown Speaker 52:03
They can’t cancel you. What are you gonna do SWAT? Yeah, get some raid. I mean, I do enough. Yeah, I could cancel myself.

Unknown Speaker 52:11
become self canceled. I come close to it. But yeah, but the I my old. I was talking to one of the guy Dan Cronin, who’s a writer for Conan Dan Cronin, writer for coding.

Unknown Speaker 52:25
But he we were messaging about something. And, and I said, it didn’t dawn on me until they took my Twitter account away where I was. I thought, I wonder if Twitter if my Twitter account has cost me work by tweeting crazy things, and, you know, getting in weird fake fights. And I mentioned that, because I think we’re tweeting or texting about work or whatever. And I was like, yeah, you know, I think Twitter might have, I might have fucked myself with my old Twitter. And he was just like, you definitely did.

Unknown Speaker 53:01
And he’s like you. He’s like, I thought you were an insane asshole until I met you. And we did a show together. And you’re a totally normal, nice guy. But your Twitter presence, you seem like a psychopath. And I guarantee you, you’ve been up for jobs. And they just googled, you looked at your Twitter and said, You know what, I don’t know what this guy’s deal is. But he just said like, I support Bill Cosby. Or

Unknown Speaker 53:27
like some other outrageous. Yeah, and you’re absolutely right. You definitely have been because I have been in I am crazy on social media. But I don’t reach to some of the depths that you’re doing. I say that in a very complimentary way. I want woke up. I woke my wife up one night, laughing hysterically and at the phone, she said What the fuck? It’s so funny. And I pointed to one of your tweets about peeping tom in your heart was beating. It seems like it’s real. Why is he Why is he posting it? I said, I’m pretty sure it’s just kidding about this, but you’d never know what this guy I that’s, you know, it’s hard for me to I get caught up in the moment of making myself laugh. Get involved in the comedy business.

Unknown Speaker 54:12
I feel like not a lot of things. make you laugh. Like, I mean, obviously, I’m friends with some of the funniest people on the planet.

Unknown Speaker 54:21
But as far as like, watching comedy movies and comedy TV shows, you’re kind of watching it through a different lens. Because you like you, it gets to a point where you just know people who are involved in everything and and you’re kind of you know, it just kind of takes away the it’s just like this peek behind the curtain where you can’t just innocently watch a comedy. And so I it’s up to me to really give myself these like juvenile giggles and and yeah, and that’s another thing like I don’t think about it on the surface, but I have a whole thing where I’m a peeping Tom. Like I just I go out and I talk about how I’m like, Look

Unknown Speaker 55:00
In Windows and

Unknown Speaker 55:02
the floorboards, my heart is beating through my chest.

Unknown Speaker 55:06
I took a picture of

Unknown Speaker 55:09
I was like I try I saw a lady in her bra, I tried to take a picture, but that was on and it’s just like, a picture of like a street. Like I just went to my back door and took a picture with a flash. That’s the one I was cracking up about. That’s the one that she thought was real, because it’s real enough, you will put an emotional,

Unknown Speaker 55:28
emotional attachment to it or, I mean, you do have to think about because then like, you know, I saw a friend of mine recently, she tweeted that there was an actual, you know, that their neighbors saw somebody looking under Windows or whatever. And I’m like, the reality of it is awful. So and like even when I’m doing the peeping tom things I’m thinking like, Is somebody gonna write people love to be fucking angry and call people out and I’m just like, waiting for someone to be like, you know, I’m glad you’re having fun with all this, but I actually had a peeping Tom, who, you know, did terror terrorized my life for two years. And and now you know, and he’s in jail. And he tried like, and it’s like, yes, I’m not. I get it like that. Everybody has a lot of experiences. I mean, if you boiled everything down to, you know, well, this might offend somebody then don’t just never speak because there’s always going to be somebody who’s like, Well, my uncle has a wooden leg, and he slipped on a banana peel once and fell in. Oh, man. Do you think that’s funny?

Unknown Speaker 56:31
I love that complete, federal detailed, mock up of ridiculous over the top reaction to a joke. Banana peel manhole cover you got you covered all the bases.

Unknown Speaker 56:46
I had an uncle who had a wooden leg and they call them hop. And that would never go anywhere. It’d be like what are you being mean to him and being but he actually embraced being called top.

Unknown Speaker 56:57
You know, things used to be

Unknown Speaker 57:01
sensitive. One more time. I want a promo Yeah, I’ll let you go. Because I know you have things to do today. And I do appreciate your time here. Well, record podcast, it’s available. And you can go to the Patreon page. That’s where you should get it because you get the full length and all the bells and whistles and everything that comes with it. I guarantee you, you will not regret becoming a fan becoming a member of this podcast. It’s probably the best use of your time on podcasting stuff other than issues with Andy which you know, is that my current favorite, and I appreciate you coming on Brendan, and you can watch the on YouTube too. There’s a bunch of a few 100 tests, right one is before you jump into the Patreon It’s uh, yeah, and I do appreciate you being here. I wish you good luck with what you got going on today. And thanks for coming, man. Really? This? This meant a lot to me. And I’m sure we’ve means a lot to the the listeners and viewers of the show. So thank you. No, thanks for having me. Anytime. That was That was fun. I know. I know. I regret now after this. I’m going to sit down and regret 90% of what I said. No, no, no, no, it was all good, please. Fine. I I do feel like we should I’m like, we will whatever. You don’t need to talk about Joe Rogan. Everybody knows about Joe Rogan. Yeah. But the it was important to the Austin conversation because it is why the Austin thing is going on. So yeah, and now I don’t know if we’re gonna Well, yeah, I mean, I wouldn’t keep that from but now it’s almost like cliche. You know, we were talking about it a year ago. And now it’s just kind of like, when you mentioned to people that I’m thinking about getting out of LA and you’re just kind of like, oh, we’re gonna move to Austin. And I’m like, Well, I mean, at least it’s not Brad Branson. There was a time when people thought it was cool to move to Branson. He was like, What the fuck do you want to become a hillbilly? What the hell is that? At Branson, Missouri. Anybody knows of good places to move that are fairly inexpensive and

Unknown Speaker 58:59
fun. Yeah. And there’s still places to work. Also. Yeah, yeah, that’s a good, that’s a difficult one. Thanks for coming. Good luck today. And I’ll talk to you again. Bye. See you man. Thanks a lot. Guys. Have a great day. Bye.

Unknown Speaker 59:12
The one and only Brandon wants to be man. I’m sorry. Brandon Walsh is no longer exists. It’s the beam man. And he’s the host of the world record podcast. Link is in the description. the Patreon link is in the description. I hope you check it out. That’s our show for today. And no sponsors for today. I’ll see you tonight we have another episode of meet the author. To be honest, it’s gonna be a little bit of a letdown for me after getting to talk to Brendan today. So I hope you enjoyed this program. Hope you tell your friends about it. hope you come back. Hope you check out his podcast and till next time. I’m Matt nappo for the mind dog TV podcast. Thanks for coming. Have a great night. Bye for now.

A Comedy History Lesson – Joey Gaynor – The Comedy Store Memories


A Comedy History Lesson – Joey Gaynor – The Comedy Store Memories
The iconic Joey Gaynor joins me to share some of the history of stand up comedy, The famed Comedy Store, and the current state of the artform.

Joey Gaynor is a stand up comedian and actor from the great state of New Jersey, who began his stand up career in the mid ’70s and t he was doing television shows like ABC’s FRIDAYS the west coast answer to Saturday Night Live. It was there he cemented his friendship with one of his mentors, Andy Kaufman.
In 1983 Richard Pryor took joey under his wing having him as his opening act for countless sold out shows in Hollywood where Joey says, “I got the best damn tutoring you could ever have, Every night after the shows he would sit down with me and talk to me about what I was doing, and more importantly WHY and how I should try this or that. I feel so Blessed to have had a relationship like that with my idol.”
Over the years Joey has worked in film and television with the likes of Leslie Neilson, Paul Sorvino, Thora Birch and the late great Jonathan Winters. Joey also co-starred in what is now a cult classic “COMEDY’S DIRTIEST DOZEN” with , Tim Allen and the late great Bill Hicks.
He also was one of Robert Townsend’s “ORIGINAL PARTNERS IN CRIME” for HBO and guest starred on “HOUSE”, “E.R.” and in the movie “THE FIVE HEARTBEATS”. Joey was also one of the driving forces behind Troma Films Cult CLassic “FEROCIOUS FEMALE FREEDOM FIGHTERS” which Blockbuster rated five stars and called it “Even funnier than “What’s up Tiger Lily”. After a much needed hiatus, Joey is back and rocking audiences once again.

Sponsors: https://mybookie.com PROMO CODE: minddog
https://record.webpartners.co/_6_DFqqtZcLQWqcfzuvZcQGNd7ZgqdRLk/1

Approaching Life With A Comedic Warp – Shaun Eli – Stand-up comedian


Stand-up comedian Shaun Eli has rightfully been called one of America’s smartest comics. Whether it’s a story about dining with a vegetarian or successfully fighting a parking ticket, master storyteller Shaun Eli shows you that there’s hilarity in the ordinary if you approach life with a comedic warp. Job interviews? Serving on a NYC criminal jury? How about the Ten Commandments? For just about anything he’s experienced Shaun has a hilarious story at the ready.

Clean Comedian Shaun Eli

SPONSORS: https://apply.fundwise.com/minddog
https://mybookie.com PROMO CODE minddog
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Joe Rogan | The Amazon is a Colossal Mystery w/Graham Hancock


Taken from Joe Rogan Experience #1284 w/Graham Hancock:

Joe Rogan on the Conor/Khabib Aftermath


Taken from JRE MMA Show #45:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aLRIQADKrak

David Blaine Regurgitates a Live Frog on the Joe Rogan Experience


Taken from JRE #1527 w/David Blaine: https://youtu.be/NY3Zg37nIHo

Joe Rogan's Thoughts on Slap Fighting, "Jeff Goldblum" Street Fight, Praying Mantises


Taken from JRE #1473 w/Tom Papa:
https://youtu.be/EToUmoEYGuU